Skip to main content

Seoul peace prize to Modi, who "isn't seeking" peaceful solution to Kashmir: Korean NGOs

Counterview Desk
As many as 28 Korean human rights and civil organizations, in a joint statement titled "Seoul Peace Prize to PM Modi: Why should we feel embarrassed, while they know no shame", has denounced awarding a ‘Peace Prize' in the name of Seoul to Modi, saying he is "accountable for the murders of thousands of Muslims".
Asserting that the Seoul Peace Prize cannot be praised as a prize established for the ‘global peace', the statement recalled, In October last year, the Seoul Peace Prize Cultural Foundation chose Modi, as the 14th Seoul Peace Prize recipient, and at that time also they opposed the move.
The ceremony to award the prize took place in Seoul on February 22 during Modi's visit to Korea.

The statement said:

Seoul Peace Prize is awarded by the Seoul Peace Prize Foundation which is a private organization created after the 1988 Seoul Olympics. Since the selection of the controversial incumbent politician Mori as the awardee of this year, questions were raised about the identity of the prize which has the word “Seoul” in its name.
Later it was also revealed that any human rights and peace experts were not participating in Seoul Peace Prize selection committee. Modi’s winning of the prize was a problem not only in Korea but also in India. Although Seoul Peace Prize was presented by a private foundation, the Modi government has promoted loudly the decision of the Seoul Peace Prize. Indian civil society raised questions about the reason why the foundation decided to give the prize to Modi.
The fact that Modi does not deserve the Peace Prize has been getting clearer. According to a recent report by Human Rights Watch, the violence of the Hindu far-right militant has soared since Prime Minister Modi came to power in 2014. The Modi government is abetting the violence against Muslims and the hate speech by government officials has been increasing.
This discrimination and suppression against Muslims were foreseen since the time Modi took the office. He has been criticized as a “murderer” for assisting the murders of thousands of Muslims during the period when he was a Chief Minister of Gujarat. The suppression by the Modi government is not limited to Muslims. Dalit, who are the victims of the caste system, human rights activists, and labor unions are also subject to Modi’s suppression.
Already in October, right after the announcement about the winner of the prize, South Korea’s 26 civil society organizations strongly requested the cancellation of the award, pointing out that giving the award to Modi has no difference to giving the award to Chun Doo-hwan, a military dictator in Korea from 1980 to 1988 who is accountable for the gross human rights violations committed during the Gwangju uprising. It is deplorable that Prime Minister Modi is nevertheless going to visit South Korea to receive the award.
The foundation said that Modi not only improved the lives of 1.35 billion Indian people but also contributed to world peace by promoting global welfare based on economic cooperation with countries around the world and promoted international solidarity through the active foreign policy promotion.
Also it argued that Modi led the integration and economic growth of Indian society with his philosophy of “joint efforts and engagement growth” and succeeded in making cooperation with neighboring countries.
Awarding the Peace Prize to Modi is highly likely to be used in the political context. During the local elections last December, Modi’s ruling party was defeated because of the opposition from farmers who had suffered from the economic policies of the Modi government. In January, Indian workers went on a general strike in protest of the Modi government’s pro-business policies. It is not clear whether Prime Minister Modi will be re-elected in the general elections in May this year.
Above all, the Modi government is not seeking a peaceful settlement for the ongoing violence and conflict in Kashmir. There are concerns that continued oppression and violence against Muslims will become more serious throughout the Modi government ahead of the general elections scheduled for May this year. Such continued anti-peace and anti-human rights actions have left Modi in a disadvantageous position in the upcoming general elections. This is why Modi is already promoting this award actively in India.
It also infers South Korea’s stand towards the people who are responsible for human rights violations in the international community. Awarding the prize to Modi gives the impression that South Korea supports anti-human rights and anti-peace policies, including the suppression against Muslims by the Modi government, to India and the international communities.
---
*Click HERE for the list of NGOs

Comments

Uma Sheth said…
The fact that he was selected at all gives rise to the question: how did he manage it?

TRENDING

Telangana govt proposes to give unfettered powers to forest officials, 'help' corporates

By Dr Palla Trinadha Rao*
The Telangana Government is contemplating to replace the Telangana Forest Act 1967 with a new law - the Telangana Forest Act (TFA) 2019, trampling the rights of adivasis ensured under the Scheduled Tribes and other Traditional Forest Dwellers (Recognition of Forest Rights) Act, 2006 (FRA Act 2006) and Panchayats Extension to Schedule Area (PESA) Act 1996 both of which are central acts.

Lynching as state terror? Complete dearth of 'political will' to deal with mob violence

By Fr Cedric Prakash sj*
On Friday July 5, thousands of people had gathered at a rally in Surat to protest against the growing mob lynching incidents in different parts of the country. There are different interpretations at what happened during the rally: with police blaming the rallyists and those in the rally blaming the police for using teargas shells upon them without any reason.

RSS, Hindu Mahasabha were 'subservient' to British masters: Nagpur varsity VC told

Counterview Desk
Well-known political scientist Shamsul Islam, associate professor (retired), University of Delhi, in an open letter to the vice-chancellor of the Rashtrasant Tukadoji Maharaj Nagpur University, Dr Siddharthavinayaka P Kane, has taken strong exception to the varsity decision to include RSS’ “role” in nation building in the syllabus of the BA (history) course, citing instances to say that the RSS ever since its birth in 1925 with its Hindutva allies like Hindu Mahasabha led by VD Savarkar worked overtime to “betray the glorious anti-colonial freedom struggle”.

One lakh schools closed down, draft policy 'seeks' commercialisation: Whither RTE?

By Our Representative
A national consultation on the new draft National Education Policy (NEP) with senior experts, teachers’ association representatives and other stakeholders at the India International Centre in New Delhi on July 11, organised by the Right to Education (RTE) Forum, has expressed serious concern over curtailment in the budgeted expenditure on education year after year, even as closure of more than one lakh schools over the "last few years."

British companies export 'deadly' asbestos to India, other countries from offshore offices

By Rajiv Shah
“The Sunday Times”, which forms part of the powerful British daily, “The Times”, has raised the alarm that though the “deadly” asbestos is banned in Britain, companies registered in United Kingdom, and operating from other countries, “are involved in shipping it to developing nations”, especially India. India, Brazil, Russia and China account for almost 80% of the asbestos consumed globally every year, it adds.

Mental health: India's 95% patients "deprived" of medical care, treatment gap 70%

By Moin Qazi*
Among the many challenges India faces, the most underappreciated is the ongoing mental health crisis. Mental illness is actually India’s ticking bomb. An estimated 56 million Indians suffer from depression, and 38 million from anxiety disorders. For those who suffer from mental illness, life can seem like a terrible prison from which there is no hope of escape; they are left forlorn and abandoned, stigmatized, shunned and misunderstood.

Gender budgeting? Govt of India allocates just 2.1%, 0.73% for SC, ST women

By Rajiv Shah
The National Campaign on Dalit Human Rights (NCDHR), one of the most influential all-India Dalit rights networks, has taken strong exception to the manner in which the Government of India has undermined Gender Responsive Budgeting in the Union Budget 2019-20 for scheduled castes (SCs) and scheduled tribes (STs), pointing towards “wide gaps” between the goals and the situational reality of “the Dalit and Adivasi women on the ground.”

UN report notes 'suppression' of Kashmiri independence groups in Pakistan

By Our Representative
A top United Nations (UN) body has suggested that the intense fervour of Kashmiri nationalism isn’t just sweeping the Jammu and Kashmir (J&K) state but is equally strong in the Pakistan-occupied Kashmir (PoK), pointing towards how the Pak authorities have been seeking to suppress it by placing restrictions on rights to freedoms of expression and opinion, assembly and association on every section of PoK’s population.

Satellite data 'identify' Gujarat's Mundra among 6 of India's top air pollution hotspots

By Rajiv Shah
A fresh study, which analyzes data between February 2018 and May 2019, obtained from Tropomi, a satellite instrument on board the Dutch Copernicus Sentinel-5 Precursor satellite, has warned that coal-fired power plants and industrial clusters are India’s “worst nitrogen oxides (NOx) hotspots” contributing hugely to air pollution in Sonbhadra-Singrauli in Madhya Pradesh and Uttar Pradesh, Korba in Chhattisgarh, Talcher in Odisha, Chandrapur in Maharashtra, Mundra in Gujarat and Durgapur in West Bengal.

Campaign 'victory': Bihar considers ban on asbestos, carcinogenic to humans

Counterview Desk
In a major victory for anti-asbestos campaigners, the Bihar government has said that it is considering an immediate ban on use of asbestos&based products of all kinds in the state. Speaking in the state assembly, Bihar chief minister Nitish Kumar insisted on the need to taking a strong policy decision against carcinogenic asbestos factories.
A communication, meanwhile, has been forwarded  to the health secretary by Kumar, referring to concerns of Dr Gopal Krishna, who heads the Ban Asbestos Network of India (BANI) "on hazardous asbestos factories to the health department." Krishna said that the health department should looking into the demand for the creation of a register of victims of asbestos related diseases.
He added, the government should also create a register asbestos laden buildings and products in general and a probe on the health status of workers, their families and communities linked to and in proximity of the two units of asbestos factories…