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Noam Chomsky, top scholars ask NRIs to take stand on human rights violations in India

Noam Chomsky
Counterview Desk
Renowned world scholars, including Noam Chomsky, James Petras, Angela Davis, Fredric Jameson, Bruno Latour, Ilan Pappe, Judith Butler, among others, have issued a statement castigating the Narendra Modi government for allegedly creating an environment of fear through arrests, intimidation and violence.
Signed under the aegis of Fresh Perspectives, USA, the academics, mainly from the US and UK, have said that the current environment in India under Prime Minister Narendra Modi and the “alarming clampdown on every form of dissent in India.”
The statement appeals to “all students, workers, educationalists, writers, social justice activists, and Non-Resident Indians (NRIs) to take a stand on these human rights violations and demand immediate release of all imprisoned rights activists”.

Text of the statement: 

Since Narendra Modi took the Prime Minister’s office in 2014, there has been an alarming clampdown on every form of political dissent in India.
In recent months, the Maharashtra police arrested several prominent human rights activists including Varavara Rao, Arun Ferreira, Vernon Gonsalves, Sudha Bharadwaj, Gautam Navlakha and others in the Bhima- Koregaon case.
In a similar way, several years ago, Delhi University Professor Saibaba and political activist Kobad Ghandy were imprisoned on fabricated charges. All these social activists have a long history of challenging state violence and human rights abuses through democratic and constitutional means. Through their civil and human rights activism, they have become the voice of the voiceless, be it socially and economically marginalized communities, indigenous people, religious minorities, and victims of all kinds of oppressions in society.
As public intellectuals, writers, and poets they took the responsibility to develop political awareness, critical thinking, and the notion of social justice among the general public.
In Modi’s India, appalling attacks on Dalits (the so-called untouchables), Adivasis (the aboriginals of India), rationalists, Muslims and other religious minorities, and rights activists including human rights organizations like Amnesty International have continued and intensified.
The Modi Government, as part of its long-term political agenda to establish the Hindu nation, has been using its authority to silence any voice that challenges its domination and repression. The government has been using legal and extra-legal methods to suppress democratic, rational, and secular forces. In recent years, the vigilante groups associated with the ruling party have killed several rationalists, journalists, and secularists.
Moreover, the ruling party, by using its “legal” methods, has coercively detained and imprisoned public activists who are defending the fundamental rights of the people. To put them in prison the state first used its friendly media outlets to propagate the lie that these civil rights activists were conspiring to overthrow the Indian state.
By concocting a series of conspiracy stories, both the Indian state and the Maharashtra Government worked together to put civil rights activists behind the bars under draconian colonial sedition law.
These human rights violations raise questions of the responsibility of the international community and the global civil society in times of crisis. When the Supreme Court is unable to check the abuse of constitutional power and the judicial system cannot deliver justice to victims of state violence, then what should citizens do?
With all these undemocratic and authoritarian activities, the Indian state appears to be bulldozing its own constitution that upholds fundamental democratic rights and secular values.
Using all kinds of oppressive methods, the Modi Government is creating fear and apprehension among the people who challenge its neoliberal economic policies and ultra-nationalist agenda. These are pressing questions that we, as civil/human rights activists, are very concerned about.
We sincerely appeal to all students, workers, educationalists, writers, social justice activists, and Non-Resident Indians (NRIs) to take a stand on these human rights violations and demand immediate release of all imprisoned rights activists.
As citizens and immigrants, your voices play an important role in shaping public opinion in the campaign to free these wrongfully imprisoned activists. Your support to democracy, justice and free speech will help boost the morale of rights activists and democratic struggles in India. We invite all of you to actively participate in this global campaign and extend your solidarity with democratic rights activists.
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Click HERE for list of signatories

Comments

Unknown said…
Various Indian governments, since 1947 have been MAFIAS comprising of the most corrupt bureaucracy, politicians supported by so called premier investigation and intelligence agencies like CBI, DRI, ED, etc. to implicate dissenters through forged and manipulated evidences.
I have evidence of the same, and am living in exile since 2004.
Anonymous said…
Manufacturing consent
vimal krishna said…
Looks like their voice has no takers in USA or the WEST, so India a green field?
There are no HR violations in India Mr. Chomski, use your intellect to keep your society drug and violence-free.
Raj said…
Well said. What does Chomsky know about India. Did he speak against terrorism in India or against human rights violation of minority in his own country?
Uma Sheth said…
When resident Indians do not think there is anything wrong with what Modi is doing, how can you expect NRIs to do so?
Sourav Das said…
NRIs, lots of them who belong from certain community from India are blind bhakts of Modi. Academics are either in exile or has put a blind eye and disowned the country already. This is a sad time and the plea is righteous.
Prof.Srinivasa Kunuthur said…
The freedom of thought, word, and deed are remarkable in India as compared to several countries of the world. The country absorbs well diverse races and religions across the world befitting the ancient culture and civilization that the country is endowed with. Whereas, certain antisocial and subversive elements abuse and misuse the freedom, it is quite but natural that the governance prevents civic disorder with criminal intents to keep the country peaceful and stable. Such corrective measures should not be construed as violative of human rights. It is essential to realize that human rights and responsibilities are two sides of the same coin and go together and they are not mutually exclusive.

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