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Increase in online harassment of India's journalists by troll armies, hate messengers

By Nava Thakuria*
Each India year India records five to six journalists’ deaths take place. In the first half of 2019, so far two incidents of scribes’ murders have taken place. The first victim belongs to Maharashtra. Anand Narayan was reportedly murdered on June 4 at Antop Hill locality of Mumbai. Narayan, 38, was murdered at his residence by the miscreants.
Mumbai police have already registered a murder case over the fateful incident. The second casualty was reported from Madhya Pradesh, where Chakresh Jain, 40, was burnt to death by assailants in Shahgarh locality on 19 June.
India’s immediate neighbours, except Pakistan that routinely ranks among the most dangerous countries for scribes, have shown encouraging statistics. Those nations including Bangladesh, Tibet (under China), Nepal, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Maldives and Bhutan have not reported any incident of scribe-murders since 1 January this year.
However, harassments to media persons have been reported from most of the countries in the Indian sub-continent. Besides local journalist organizations across the country, New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) and Brussels-based International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) have condemned the spate of attacks and murders of media persons in India and called on the authority for urgent action to improve journalists’ safety in the vast country.
The largest democracy in the world lost six journalists (Navin Nischal, Vijay Singh, Sandeep Sharma, Syed Shujaat Bukhari, Achyuta N Sahu and Chandan Tiwari) to assailants last year. Bihar based-reporters, Navin Nischal (35) and Vijay Singh (26), were hit by a running vehicle in Bhojpur locality on 25 March and they died on way to the hospital.
Next day, Madhya Pradesh journalist Sandeep Sharma (36) was deliberately mowed down by a truck in Bhind locality and the dedicated reporter on environment issues succumbed to injuries on 26 March. Kashmiri journalist Syed Shujaat Bukhari (50) was shot dead in Srinagar on 14 June by a group of militants.
Jharkhand journalist Chandan Tiwari (32), who used to report on corruption issues, was abducted and later his body was found on 30 October in Chatra locality, where Doordarshan cameraperson Achyuta Nanda Sahu (34) was killed in a Maoist (ultra-Left) terror attack at Dhantewada of Chhattisgarh on the same day.
The 2017 was reported as a deadliest year for Indian journalists, as 12 scribes (Hari Prakash, Brajesh Kumar Singh, Shyam Sharma, Kamlesh Jain, Surender Singh Rana, Gauri Lankesh, Shantanu Bhowmik, KJ Singh, Rajesh Mishra, Sudip Datta Bhaumik, Naveen Gupta and Rajesh Sheoran) were either murdered or killed in suspicious situations. 
Among the casualties, northeast Indian province of Tripura reported two incidents of journo-murder. Shantanu, a young reporter was beaten and stabbed to death during a protest demonstration at Mandai locality, where Sudip Datta was shot dead by a Tripura State Rifles constable at RK Nagar locality. In 2016, India witnessed the targeted killings of six scribes, whereas the previous year the country lost five journalists to assailants.
Journalists are are victims of police violence, attacks by Maoist fighters and reprisals by criminal groups or corrupt politicians 
An improved statistics on journo-murder index was observed in 2014, when the country reported only two incidents of journo-murders. But year 2013 emerged a dangerous year for scribes with 11 casualties including three media employees (Sujit Bhattacharya, Ranjit Chowdhury and Balaram Ghosh) from Tripura.
According to Reporters sans Frontieres (RSF), or Reporters without Borders, the number of countries regarded as safe, where journalists can work in complete security, continues to decline as authoritarian regimes have tightened their grip on the media. Indeed, journalists have to work against totalitarian propaganda, censorship, intimidation, physical violence and cyber-harassment across the world.
In the latest world media freedom index, published by the Paris-based RSF, Norway topped the list of countries with admirable media freedom. Finland, Sweden, Netherlands, Denmark, Switzerland, New Zealand, Jamaica, Belgium etc. follow it in the RSF’s 2019 World Press Freedom Index. On the other hand, North Korea, China and Vietnam continue to be at the bottom of the list.
India (positioned at 140) is below than United States (48), Bhutan (80), Israel (88), Maldives (98), Nepal (106), Afghanistan (121), Sri Lanka (126), Myanmar (138) in the list, where Pakistan (142), Cambodia (143), Venezuela (148), Russia (149), Bangladesh (150), Vietnam (176), China (177), North Korea (179), Turkmenistan (180) etc follow it.
"Violence against journalists including police violence, attacks by Maoist fighters and reprisals by criminal groups or corrupt politicians is one of the most striking characteristics of the current state of press freedom in India. Killing of journalists in connection with their works indicates many dangers that journalists often face, especially those working for regional media outlets in rural India,” said Daniel Bastard of RSF.
Speaking to this writer recently from Paris, RSF’s South Asia desk head added that other worrying trend that needs to be addressed in the Indian sub-continent is the high level of censorship and self-censorship, lack of pluralism in certain countries and political affiliation of media group owners.
With mainstream journalism going increasingly online and the advent of alternative media, newer threats are rising, observed Daniel. He said, "We are now seeing online harassment of journalists by troll armies, dissemination of false information, and hate speech messages calling for killing of journalists whose work displeases those in power and their supporters.”
The vulnerable Indian media fraternity has been pursuing for a national action plan to safeguard their interest in the line of military, police and doctors on duty. Their arguments are loud and clear; if India wants the journalists to do the risky jobs for the greater interest, their security along with justice must be ensured in the largest democracy on the Earth.
---
*Guwahati-based media activist

Comments

Manickavasagam Rangasamy said…
Freedom of the Press only for media moghuls, not scribes

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