Skip to main content

Top British weekly blames Amit Shah over 'destabilization' in Assam over citizenship


By Our Representative
In a sharply-worded attack on Union home minister Amit Shah, who is Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s most trusted Man Friday in the ruling establishment, top British weekly “The Economist” has said that the recent “rant” of the top politician calling immigrants from Bangladesh in Assam “termites” and “infiltrators” is not just “a standard bluster from a nativist politician railing against illegal immigration.”
Calling it as suggestive of “threat to stability” waiting to take place, the weekly says, “The supposed illegal immigrants are overwhelmingly Muslim. The purge is exacerbating sectarian tension in a state that saw bloody Hindu-Muslim riots as recently as 2012, when some 400,000 people were displaced.” Despite such state of affairs, Shah considers the campaign in Assam against “illegal” immigrants “such a success that he wants to replicate it throughout the entire country.”
According to “The Economist” though Shah wants all these people will be “deported”, ironically, the neighbouring Bangladesh, from which they are said to have migrated, “will not accept them, since in most cases there is no evidence that they are anything other than Indians, too poor and uneducated to navigate the complex bureaucracy of citizenship.”
Published in “The Economist’s” latest print edition under the heading “Show me your papers”, the periodical says, “India’s hunt for ‘illegal immigrants’ is aimed at Muslims”, as “Many are in fact citizens.” Pointing out that Muslims make up a third of Assam’s population, it claims, “The state’s shifting demography is mainly the result of a higher birth rate among Bengalis already in Assam, not migration.”
Yet, it says, Amit Shah’s party, ,BJP, which dominates both the state and national governments, “has not stopped from vowing to collar lots of illegal immigrants. While four million were declared foreigner last year, and another 100,000 this year in June, the weekly states, the saffron party wants that “since so few of them exist, more had to be invented.”
The periodical says, “Like so many of the BJP’s schemes, the hunt for illegal immigrants is openly anti-Muslim”, it adds, “Some Hindus have been caught in the dragnet, but Shah says they do not need to worry, since the government has drafted a bill to make it easy for Hindu refugees to claim citizenship. Christian, Buddhist, Jain, Parsi and Sikh refugees can too -- just not Muslims.”
All this is happening, believes “The Economist”, because “anything that polarises voters by religion benefits the BJP, especially in nearby West Bengal, where Muslims are over a quarter of the population and the BJP is locked in a political knife-fight with a regional party it accuses of coddling Muslims, the Trinamool Congress.”

Comments

TRENDING

Lip-service on World Environment Day vs 'watered-down' eco-safeguards

By Shankar Sharma*  Just a few days ago, the world remembered the routinely forgotten global environment on the occasion of World Environment Day, briefly though, maybe just for the day. There were reports of a few high profile ceremonies in different parts of the country, including a few in New Delhi. Prime Minister Narendra Modi reportedly asked the people of our country to plant one tree per each person as a mark of respect/ gratitude for our mothers.

New Odia CM's tribal heritage 'sets him apart' from Hindutva Brahminical norms

By Bhabani Shankar Nayak*  Mohan Charan Majhi took the oath as the new Chief Minister of Odisha following the electoral defeat of the BJD led by Naveen Patnaik, who served as Chief Minister for twenty-four years. The new Chief Minister is the son of a security guard and a four-time MLA who hails from the remote village of Raikala in the Keonjhar district. He belongs to the Santali tribe and comes from a working-class family. Such achievements and political mobilities are possible only in a democratic society. Majhi’s leadership even in the form of symbolic representation in a democracy deserves celebration.

Pellet gun fire severely injures Dalit worker off Bangladesh border

By Kirity Roy*  This is regarding an incident of firing pellets by the Border Security Force (BSF) personnel attached with Panchadoji Border Outpost of ‘E’ Company of 90 BSF Battalion on a Schedule Caste youth of village Parmananda under Dinhata Police Station of Cooch Behar district of West Bengal. The victim was severely injured and one portion of his face became disfigured due to pellet firing by the BSF.

Sanction to persecute Arundhati Roy under UAPA politically motivated: PUCL

Counterview Network  Top human rights group, People’s Union for Civil Liberties, has demanded that the authorities should immediately withdraw the prosecution against top author Arundhati Roy and Dr Sheikh Showkat Hussain, a Kashmir academic, under the " unconstitutional"  Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act  (UAPA), calling the Delhi  Lieutenant-Governor nod for the Delhi police move "politically motivated".

A Hindu alternative to Valentine's Day? 'Shiv-Parvati was first love marriage in Universe'

By Rajiv Shah*   The other day, I was searching on Google a quote on Maha Shivratri which I wanted to send to someone, a confirmed Shiv Bhakt, quite close to me -- with an underlying message to act positively instead of being negative. On top of the search, I chanced upon an article in, imagine!, a Nashik Corporation site which offered me something very unusual. 

Swami Vivekananda's views on caste and sexuality were 'painfully' regressive

By Bhaskar Sur* Swami Vivekananda now belongs more to the modern Hindu mythology than reality. It makes a daunting job to discover the real human being who knew unemployment, humiliation of losing a teaching job for 'incompetence', longed in vain for the bliss of a happy conjugal life only to suffer the consequent frustration.

Anonymous? Following BJP debacle, social media began getting memes calling voters 'traitors'

By Rathin Das*  It was an election with a difference that taught the 'party with a difference' a lesson it will never forget. The planet's largest party, the BJP, had put its stakes so high that even a normal victory looks like a defeat.