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Strong govt policy helped China progress much better than India since Independence

By NS Venkataraman* 

As India is now completing 75 years after attaining independence from British rule and celebrating 75th year of Independence on 15th August, a careful review of the scenario in 1947 and in the year 2022 in a holistic manner will certainly convince a discerning observer that India’s achievements and progress have been substantial, significant and praiseworthy.
In 1947, when India forced Britishers to give freedom, India was an underdeveloped country with low literacy level, high level of economic disparity and large percentage of country men living below poverty line.
All such deprived conditions have changed considerably in the last seventy five years with significant industrial development, growth in agricultural production and productivity, significant improvement in literacy level and public health and reasonably good advancements in technology and particularly in digital media and information technology. The improved figures and data are well known and are in public domain.
The question is that given India’s landscape, different climatic and soil conditions, irrigation potential, mineral deposits , long coastal belt and several other advantages, should one conclude that India should have done better than what it has achieved?
The best way of answering this query would be to compare India’s growth with a few other countries facing similar conditions in 1947.

Japan & Germany

India attained independence in 1947 and during this period, Germany and Japan remained battered and virtually paralysed after facing defeat during the second world war.
Both these countries have made remarkable progress during the last seventy five years and today remain as amongst the most developed countries in the world with high level of prosperity index.
However, both Germany and Japan had reasonably strong technology base before 1947 compared to India , as a result of which both these countries could take part in the second world war and they exhibited their technological and military capability of high order.
While credit should be given to the governments and people of Germany and Japan for their remarkable progress subsequent to second world war, India’s technological and industrial base in 1947 was at a much lower level. India had to virtually start from scratch.
Therefore, comparing the growth of Germany and Japan to that of India during the last seventy five years may not be appropriate.

China

In 1947, both India and China were nearly on par as far as technology , industrial and agriculture base are concerned. In the last seventy five years, China has grown phenomenally and is now claiming super power status in the world.
China is only 15% of the global economy in size but now contributes 25 to 30% of global growth. Assuming that we don't count the European Union as one economy, China is the second largest economy in the world. China’s share of world output has gone up from 6.3% in the year 1996 to 17.8% . in the year 2020. China contributed as much as around 70% of the growth in the share of developing economies in world GDP in the last two decades.
Today, size of Indian economy is much smaller than that of China. What is the reason for this sharp difference in the growth profile of India and China?
One can say that China is a totalitarian country and, therefore, Chinese government has been able to implement any project as it deems fit without resistance from any quarters. However, mere totalitarian rule cannot be attributed as the reason for China’s success, since several other totalitarian countries have not progressed to any reasonable level.
The reason for China’s growth is the strong government and policy of the government to liberally cooperate with the developed countries in industrialisation and technology acquisition. Many multinational companies are now operating in China with large industrial capacities , substantially contributing to China’s technological growth and economy. Chinese companies have gained a lot by having joint ventures with multi national companies in China.
The credit must be given to Chinese government and people of China for this phenomenal growth.

Indian scenario

India could have done better in the last seventy five years if the following issues have been tackled adequately.
India’s population in 1947 was around 347 million and the population is 1400 million at present. The mouths to be fed have multiplied several times and India’s economic growth, though impressive, has not been adequate enough to match the population growth. In the next year , India would emerge as most populous country in the world. China too is a populous country but Chinese government has admirably controlled the population growth by it’s one child family policy, which India has not been able to do due to several reasons.
Unlike China, India is a democratic country with freedom of speech and personal freedom remaining at very high level. As a result, several projects announced by the government have been criticised and resisted by section of activists and several political parties with India emerging as the noisiest democracy in the world. Several well meaning schemes could not be implemented and good projects have been forced to close down due to the protests by the so called activists and some political parties. The latest example is that of Sterlite Copper plant in Tamil Nadu. Due to the closure of this plant, India has become net importer of copper, whereas India was a big exporter of copper when the Sterlite Copper plant was operating. Another example is the very important and technologically significant Neutrino project, which has been stopped by political groups. So many other examples can be readily pointed out.
Another major issue is the rapidly developing dynastic politics in India, where family groups are holding vice like grip over several political parties all over India. Except BJP and communist parties, all other political parties in India today are dynastic parties under family control. In this scenario, due to development of situation where the family groups are ruling several states and with vested interests developing, administrative standards have deteriorated and in several states , political corruption has reached an unacceptable level. Committed people with proven competence are unable to win elections based on their merit. Such conditions have become a drag on the overall growth of the country.
What scenario for coming years?
During the last eight years, Prime Minister Modi has elevated the quality of governance to a higher level and has introduced several imaginative schemes, keeping in view the requirement of the people at lower economic level as well as the compulsive need to forge ahead in terms of technology and productivity. Even in the present post COVID period where several countries in the world including developed countries are facing serious issues of inflation and recession, Indian economy is doing much better. This fact has been recently confirmed by a report from International Monetary Fund (IMF).
Though several opposition political parties and some activists have been opposing and criticising Modi’s governance in severe terms, the overall view amongst the cross section of country men appear to be that Prime Minister Modi has done reasonably good job and this trend should continue.
---
Trustee, Nandini Voice For The Deprived, Chennai

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