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Celebrating surgical strike, war: India "follows" Mussolini, who said peace is absurd, three cheers for war?

By Sheshu Babu*
"War alone brings up to their highest tension all human energies and imposes the stamp of nobility upon the peoples who have the courage to make it" –Benito Mussolini
There are number of instances when the present ruling party promoted 'nationalism' through various programmes. It is leaving no stone unturned to express its patriotic intent and directing people to follow its footsteps. One of the latest example is Parakram Parv, or celebrating surgical strikes, showcasing the valor of armed forces from September 28 to 30.
According to an Indian Army spokesperson, “On September 29-30, noted singers are scheduled to perform at the venue (India Gate) apart from military band.” A notice sent out by University Grants Commission (UGC) on September 19, 2018 asked student to 'pledge their support to the armed forces' by writing letters or cards. It also encourages students and faculty to visit multimedia exhibition to be organized at India gate.

Dissent expressed

Historian Aditya Mukherjee of the Jawaharlal Nehru University, co-author of the book “India's Struggle for Freedom” disagrees. "This is typically the BJP trying to project themselves as the nationalists. They have this great deficit of not being part of the national movement. Now, they are trying to force it on people and militarize campuses. They wanted to install tanks in JNU and if we oppose, it, they will call us anti- national", he said, adding, “This is no way to arouse nationalism.”
Mussolini: Peace is absurd
Aligarh Muslim University (AMU) students union president Mashkoor Ahmed Usmani said that under previous UPA as well as NDA governments, surgical strikes were carried out across the border but” no attempt has been made to highlight it in this manner.” He added, the government has failed on all fronts like security and curbing incidents like rape and, therefore, it is doing such things by imposing on institutions.

Promoting nationalism

Using attacks on neighbouring army bunkers and soldiers to express patriotism and force people to believe, seems to be the latest agenda for gaining popularity. Pakistan is being used as a synonym to terrorism, India's prime enemy and root of all evils. The present government is showing its act as its own “personal” achievement. As Palapre Balakrishnan, writing in “The Hindu” (September 25, 2018) says:
"...None of India's Prime Ministers had gloated over victory in war. Lal Bahadur Shastri's humility helped him steer clear of this in 1965, and Indira Gandhi, not given to undue modesty, did not make capital out of the India-Pakistan war of 1971, which had left the adversary not just bloodied but halved. It was left to others to liken her to Durga. In their dignified silence, India's former Prime Ministers had followed the practice of great leaders who refuse to glory in aggression. The countries of Europe remember the sacrifices of their soldiers in the two world wars but they do so with restraint. Can it be said that they love their country less for merely wearing a flower for a day, not requiring their great universities to celebrate victory in war?”

Promoting peace

The basic feature of fascism is being given importance by the present regime. "Peace is absurd. Fascism does not believe in it", said Mussolini. "Three cheers for war, noble and beautiful above all", he added. This is trend of 'celebrating' strike is dangerous.
People of both countries do not want war on each other. There are many organisations on both sides that promote friendship. Writers, journalists and civil rights activists in both India and Pakistan work for peace and harmony. The governments supported by some fanatics and military are against peace and use war as a tool to further their own political interests.
Pete Seeger... "We shall live in peace"
India has a great legacy of Ashoka, who was quick to realise the futility of war after the mass killings in the battle of Kalinga. The Chandala kings, after victory in war, built exquisite temples of Khajuraho to be used by people. Even Bhagvat Gita, revered by the Hindutva forces, does not prescribe war as a solution. Teachings of Buddha are replete with non- violent way of living. The people should question such celebrations that spew hatred.
Instead of celebration, peace marches must be held all over India and academicians and students should conduct seminars on peace and how to solve burning issues like rapes, atrocities on women, Dalits, Muslims and differently abled persons etc. They should force governments of both nations to hold peace talks. 
Similarly, Pakistanis must also conduct peace marches and urge their rulers to demilitarize borders and reduce tensions so that people living in border areas live in peace and harmony.
---
*The writer from everywhere and anywhere believes like Pete Seeger:
"We shall live in peace
We shall live in peace
We shall live in peace… some day"

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