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Delhi's 75% young Hindu women practice ghughat; it's 90% in urban Rajasthan and UP: Pennsylvania univ survey

By Rajiv Shah
While the Narendra Modi government may want to fight gender inequality by passing the triple talaq bill in the Lok Sahba, a recent study has revealed that Delhi’s 75% of young Hindu women in the group 18-25 practice ghunghat. Based on high profile Social Attitude Research, India (SARI) survey, the study also finds that, in this young age, whopping 98% women in rural Rajasthan, 90% in urban Rajasthan, and 91% in rural Uttar Pradesh, and 90% in urban Uttar Pradesh practice ghughat.
The SARI survey was carried out in 2016 by the Center for the Advanced Study of India (CASI), University of Pennsylvania. Its results have been published in November 2017 as a paper by the Research Institute for Compassionate Economics (RICE), “Explicit prejudice: Evidence from a new survey”, authored by Diane Coffey, Payal Hathi, Nidhi Khurana and Amit Thorat.
The study claims, it is a “representative” sample of adults in Delhi, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh, and SARI “dataset is unique”. Done by “using low-cost phone survey methods”, responses from 753 men and 658 women were sought in Delhi, as against 791 men and 808 women in Uttar Pradesh, and 1611 men and 1749 women in in Rajasthan . Between 18% and and 29% respondents agreed to be interviewed.
Calling ghunghat as one of the three indicators of “prejudice against women”, the study says, the other two SARI captured were on whether respondents think women should not work outside the home, and whether men eat meals first.
The study defines ghunghat as the “practice of women veiling their heads or faces with the end of a sari or a dupatta”, insisting it “reinforcing women’s unequal position in families and in society”, agreeing that ghunghat has “a different social meaning than pardah, the practice of women’s seclusion common in Muslim households.”
However, it underscores, “Hindu women who do not practice ghunghat report having say in more decisions related to their own lives than women who do”, with women who do not practice ghunghat are “12 percentage points more likely” to report having at least some say in household decision making.”
Providing age-wise breakup in Delhi, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh, the study says, “Although urban areas show some age gradient in the practice, rural areas show little, and overall the age gradient is less steep than we expected. This may be because ghunghat can be practiced more or less intensely.”
Refusing to identify age-wise intensity of ghunghat according to age, the study says, while a “younger woman might practice ghunghat by covering her whole face, while an older woman covers only her hair, our data do not capture these differences.”
Claiming that the SARI survey results are similar to those of the “nationally representative 2011 India Human Development Survey (IHDS)”, which was carried out in 2011, the study says, “There is also less of a difference in the percent of women who practice ghunghat between rural and urban areas than we expected, though again, we have not measured the intensity of the practice.”
Providing data for other age groups, the study says, 63% of Delhi women in the age group 26-40 and 44% in the age group 41-60 practice ghughat. The respective percentage for rural Rajasthan is 99 and 89; and for urban Rajasthan it is 89 and 84. As for rural Uttar Pradesh, 94% and 93% women in the age groups 26-40 and 41-60 respectively practice ghughat, and in urban Uttar Pradesh, the percentage is 63 and 39 respectively.

Comments

Uma Sheth said…
Wonder if we ever get UCC this and other archaic practices will be done away with.
raul2407 said…
While majority of Muslim women in India are married before they are adult, 99% of them are forced to wear Burqa/Hijab, Some foreign funded leftists are busy in targeting Hindu women on 'Ghunghat', Look at their targeted agenda.

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