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Sheikh Matlub Ali, symbol of Hindu-Muslim unity in crowded columns of power corridors

By Bhabani Shankar Nayak*

Amidst the names of politicians crowded the columns of power corridors in history but in contemporary political and cultural firmaments of India, nobody can match Sheikh Matlub Ali of Odisha. He was born on December 16, 1942 in a village called Dharoshyam Sundarpur, Sukleswar (Mahanga) in Cuttack district and studied in the famous Ravenshaw College, Odisha. His life was a praxis of Gandhian principles with Nehruvian outlooks. He was an incomparable icon of Hindu Muslim unity in Odisha.
In his untimely death, Odisha lost one of her greatest sons and Odias lost their voice of reason. His death has created a void in the social, political, cultural and literary world of Odisha. He has led a meaningful life both in the field of politics and literature.
Sheikh Matlub Ali was a very proud Odia, a Muslim and an Indian nationalist. There was no conflict between his three different identities. He wears these three identities with equal pride. He represented the composite culture in Odisha, which resolved the differences. He was a symbol of Hindu-Muslim unity in the state.
He knew Hindu religion as much as he knew Islam. He studied different religions in depth and practiced secular politics in his everyday life. He contributed immensely in popularising Jagannath culture. He was a fine polemical speaker of interfaith dialogues, excelling in colloquial Odia irony and humour.
He popularised composite Odia culture and practiced it in his everyday life. He led a life of Hindu- Muslim unity and brotherhood. He was a leader of Hindus, Muslims, and all socially and economically marginalised communities in Odisha. His house was always open to all.
Sheikh Matlub Ali was a leading luminary in shaping the democratic, secular and progressive politics and literature in Odisha. He was widely accepted by all sections of Odia society irrespective of political differences and party lines. His integrity, tenacity, and compassion are rare qualities in Indian politics.
He was a consummated politician but the politics of power could not destroy his humanly qualities. He moved beyond the arithmetic of electoral politics. He was defeated in electoral politics based on propaganda and corporate media management. But he never ceased to work for the people for a day even after electoral debacles. For him, election was a mean to do social work for people. 
He stood with people during their everyday crisis, whether it was floods and cyclones in coastal belt or drought in southern Odisha, he was always there to ensure relief and rehabilitation work. He worked with both international and national NGO’s to expand his social work among lower caste and working-class people in the state.
He was dedicated, committed, generous, principled and influential far beyond his native Mahanga constituency in Odisha. He was popular in the state both for his commitment to politics and literature focusing on empowering people and their welfare. His politics was shaped by Gandhian ideals of peace, secularism and democracy.
As a Gandhian, he stayed with the Congress Party till his last breath. He was elected four times to the Odisha Assembly and contributed immensely for the growth of irrigation infrastructure, rural development and education in the state as a minister. He was a lifelong champion of rural poor and other causes he believed in, argued for his ideas resolutely but briefly with all clarity and backed by detailed study. His gentle manner is rare in politics today.
He knew Hindu religion as much as he knew Islam. He studied different religions in depth and practiced secular politics in everyday life
Personally, I lost a father like friend and going to miss his guidance on life and career. I had many memorable meetings with him over twenty years. One meeting is imprinted vividly in my memory lane, which defines my relationship with him. It also reveals Sheikh Matlub Ali as a person.
Before leaving for Britain for my doctoral research, I met him in his Bhubaneswar house in September 2003. He was immensely happy and concerned as if I am one of his own family members. He was worried about my financial condition, health and weather in Britain. He introduced me to his friend Prafulla Mohanty, an internationally acclaimed Odia painter, who lives in London.
He called him and asked him to look after me. He discussed my research topic and asked me not to fall into European outlooks while analysing Indian context. He advised me to look after my health and not to forget our Odia roots. In the hurly-burly of life, I regret that I was not in touch with him regularly but every meeting was full of warmth, love and care.
He was a Congressman in letter and spirit. I am a communist. We used to discuss, debate and disagree passionately but there was never an emotional and social breaking point because of his ability to assimilate himself with differences without losing his own ideological position in life. During one of our meetings, he discussed about the cultural and social problems of Marxism in Indian context.
He argued that Indian society is a diverse society and no single philosophical outlook can analyse and be a single alternative in India. His outlined it further by arguing that vile of property-based caste order and religious reactionaries are twin dangers to class struggle and progressive politics.
Therefore, he argued for secular, liberal and democratic politics for a slow transition towards socialism in India. He was insightful in his analysis and open to self-reflective criticisms. His personality reflects in his political ideals, organisational style and writings.
Sheikh Matlub Ali’s death is an irreversible loss to Indian and Odia politics. His political, social, cultural and literary legacies will dazzle and dazzle as luminous stars to guide troublesome Indian political sky towards peace and prosperity. It is important to uphold his contributions and celebrate his life to ensure harmony and happiness in Odisha, he loved the most.
---
*Coventry University, UK

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