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What would India's border security mean to mother or child 'dying' of state negligence?

By Sandeep Pandey, Kushagra Kumar*
One of the writers of this article is reminded of an incident, when he was teaching at Indian Institute of Technology, Gandhinagar which was then functioning from a campus in Chandkheda in Ahmedabad. On December 16, 2011, a dog picked up a two months old boy child Akash who was lying on ground while parents were busy cooking or eating dinner at 10 pm.
When they searched for the child, his body, eaten away, was found nearby in a field. Laxman, 22 years, and Raina, 20 years, belonged to Bhuria Scheduled Tribe community from Jhabua in Madhya Pradesh and had come to work in Ahmedabad as migrant labourers. Akash was their first child after their marriage hardly a year back.
That such an incident happened on an IIT campus points to the widening gap between the advanced technological development being pursued for the elite of the country and the living standards of unorganized masses dependent on daily wages or contractual jobs for their survival.
When the new campus for IIT Gandhinagar started getting built at Palaj around the same time, a sensitive director Dr Sudhir Jain made sure that the first constructions that took place were houses and toilets for labourers.
Now a similar gruesome incident has taken place on June 23, 2020, in Bah Tehsil of Agra District whena 26 years old woman Simpi went to relieve herself in Chambal ravines late evening she started having labour pain. She became unconsciousness after giving birth to a child but by the time she regained consciousness, the child was gone, probably taken away by some animal. 
It is a sign that in spite of all the claims about development, things haven’t changed much, at least for the underprivileged. Prime Minister Narendra Modi chose Mahatma Gandhi’s birthday, who was widely regarded for his commitment to two prominent values one of which was ‘truth,’ last year to declare that with construction of 11 crore toilets rural India was open defecation free, meaning thereby that 99% people had toilets.
The reality is that most toilets built during Swachh Bharat Abhiyan are not usable for various reasons, including corruption, another vice that the government claims to have eliminated.
The latest incident also points to the failure of Janani Suraksha Yojana of the National Health Mission whose objective is to prevent child and mother mortality by encouraging institutional delivery for poor pregnant women.
Accredited Social Health Activists are supposed to look after such pregnant women. It is a matter of enquiry whether the ASHA of Village Jodhpura in Block Pinahat of Agra was aware of the advanced stage of Simpi’s pregnancy, where she lived with her husband Sunil Kumar. The Gram Prahdan Gajendra Singh did not recommend a toilet for their home as Sunil’s Adhar Card had registered the address of a different village Raghunathpura.
Country’s security has become a major issue these days vis-à-vis our neigbours. But we hardly bother about security of individuals
That the incident happened in Agra, famous world wide for Taj Mahal, is a cruel reminder of the reason of Mumtaz Mahal's death during her 14th child birth. Looked at from another perspective, Taj Mahal is a monument of maternal mortality.
The lackadaisical attitude in our society towards pregnancy, which is so important for the health of mother as well as going to be born child for his/her remaining life, is obvious from the number of child births which took place on trains while migrant workers were returning home on Shramik special trains during the coronavirus crisis.
On May 9, Mamta Yadav, who belongs to Chappra, Bihar, delivered a baby on a train from Jamnagar to Muzaffarpur in Agra, while Shubhadra, a native of Ambedkarnagar, Uttar Pradesh, delivered a baby on the way from Jalandhar to Akbarpur in another train same day. On May 10, Sunita delivered a baby on a train from Valsad to Lucknow just before reaching Lucknow.
While the women must have been tested for Covid-19 before boarding the respective trains, nobody bothered about their advanced stages of pregnancy as they were embarking on long and tortuous journey. 80 deaths admitted by the Indian Railways on Shramik specials between 9 and 27 May point to the inhuman travel conditions that these women were also subjected to.
On the other hand, due to the threat of Covid-19 patients who needed attention for non-Covid reasons were being neglected. Imagine a pregnant woman arriving at a hospital being asked to undergo Covid test first, the result of which could take two days to arrive. On June 5, 30 years old Neelam in the eighth month of pregnancy died in an ambulance in Greater Noida after being turned away by three government and five private hospitals for lack of bed.
All these incidents prove we take life of an underprivileged in this country for granted. Country’s security has become a major issue these days vis-à-vis our neigbours like China, Pakistan and even Nepal. But we hardly appear to be bothered about security of individuals.
Even if we were to make our borders secure of what use will they be to a child or a mother who die because of negligence of the state? The country which is now behind only United States and China in terms of spending on external defence is very stingy when it comes to spending on health care.
While the class which clapped from their homes and lit candles to appreciate the medical and other staff dealing with coronavirus crisis might feel secure in their homes with either a guaranteed salary at the end of the month or comfortable bank balances, the class which was walking on highways has been left to fend for itself.
The poor development indices, whether related to education or health care, availability of toilets or proper habitation, malnourishment or fertility rate, don't make the vast masses involved in primary or secondary sectors of economy feel secure at all.
Majority of the population on subsistence livelihoods are devoid of the sense of security which should come along with development. It is high time we took a hard look at the question of equitable access to the fruits of development.
---
*Sandeep Pandey is Magsaysay award winning social activist, Kushagra Kumar is a student

Comments

Unknown said…
Hi All!

The corona virus pandemic has only exposed the rampant negligence, corruption and inadequacy present in Indian healthcare system that has always been present even prior to COVID - 19.

My family is also a victim of medical negligence. I’ve started a petition “Medical Council of India, Lilavati Hospital: Cancel License, expel Corrupt Nephrologist Hemant Mehta, Prashant Rajput who killed my Mom” on change.org

Request you to go through the petition and please sign the petition, it will only take you 30 seconds to sign it. Here’s the link:

http://www.change.org/p/medical-council-of-india-lilavati-hospital-cancel-license-expel-corrupt-nephrologist-hemant-mehta-prashant-rajput-who-killed-my-mom

Thanks!
Parag

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