Skip to main content

Distressing: For 41.34% voters cash, liquor, gifts an important factor for voting

Top 10 voters' priorities: % respondents on a scale of 5
Counterview Desk
An all-India survey on governance issues and voting behaviour 2018 by the civil rights organization, the Association for Democratic Reforms (ADR), claiming to be the largest-ever voter survey in any country, has said that the top voters’ priorities were employment and basic amenities (like healthcare, drinking water, better roads etc.), and governance issues (including terrorism and strong defence/military).
Carried out between October 2018 and December 2018 covering 534 Lok Sabha constituencies with 2,73,487 voters’ participation, an ADR note on the survey says, the results suggest “prevailing governance deficit in these sectors that is causing deprivation to the average Indian voter, besides leading to the denial of their fundamental rights like right to live with human dignity as embodied in the Article-21 of the Constitution.”

Text of the ADR note:

The three main objectives of this survey were to identify the following: (i) voters’ priorities on specific governance issues, (ii) voters’ ratings of the government's performance on those issues, and (iii) factors affecting voting behaviour.
The survey highlights the voters’ priorities on 31 listed issues like drinking water, electricity, roads, food, education, healthcare, public transport etc. in their respective regions in terms of its capacity, governance and specific role in improving their living conditions.
For assessing this, voters were asked to list their top five priorities. These voters’ priorities were further analyzed in relation to the performance of the Government on those issues as perceived by the voters.
A three-level scale of Good, Average and Bad was used, where Good was given weightage equal to 5, Average was weighted 3 and Bad was weighted as 1. It is quite clear from the top 10 voters’ priorities that Indian voters prioritize employment and basic amenities (like healthcare, drinking water, better roads etc.) above all governance issues (including terrorism and strong defence/military).
This indisputably is a result of prevailing governance deficit in these sectors that is causing deprivation to the average Indian voter besides also leading to the denial of their fundamental rights like right to live with human dignity as embodied in the Article-21 of the Constitution.
For inclusive and equitable development, it is important that the government ensures that such basic services reach all sections of the society, as it is key to developing human capabilities. The government’s performance score on the top 10 voters’ priorities is below average. This evidently indicates that the voters are unsatisfied with the government’s performance.
Hence, the government needs to prioritise and invest more particularly in these sectors. On better employment opportunities, which is the top most voters’ priority, the performance of the government has been rated as one of the worst (2.15 on a scale of 5).

Voters’ priorities and government’s performance:
 As per All India Survey 2018, better employment opportunities (46.80%), better health care (34.60%) and drinking water (30.50%) are the top three voters’ priorities at the all India level, followed by better roads (28.34%) and better public transport (27.35%) at the fourth and the fifth place, respectively.
 It is important to note that agricultural related governance issues featured predominantly in the all India top 10 voters’ priorities e.g. Availability of water for agriculture (26.40%) that was ranked sixth, agriculture loan availability (25.62%) that was ranked seventh, higher price realization for farm products (25.41%) that was ranked eighth, and agriculture subsidy for seeds/fertilsers (25.06%) that was ranked ninth.
 The other top two voters’ priorities, better healthcare (2.35) and Drinking Water (2.52) were also rated as below average. Better healthcare was ranked seventh and Drinking Water was ranked third.
 It is a matter of serious concern that for none of the 31 listed voters’ priorities, the performance of the government was rated as average or above average.
 The worst performance of the government, as rated by the voters, were on the issues of encroachment of public lands, lakes etc., terrorism, training for jobs, strong defence/military, eradication of corruption, lower food prices for consumers and mining/quarrying.
 The comparative analysis between All India Mid-Term Survey 2017 and All India Survey 2018 reveals that the top two voters’ priorities (better employment opportunities and better hospitals/primary healthcare centres) have continued to remain at the top.
 The significance of better employment opportunities as voter’s highest priority has increased by 56.67% from 30% in 2017 to 47% in 2018. At the same time, the performance of the government on this issue declined from 3.17 to 2.15 on a scale of 5.
 The significance of better hospitals/primary healthcare centres as voter’s second highest priority has increased by 40% from 25% in 2017 to 35% in 2018. At the same time, the performance of the government on this issue declined from 3.36 to 2.35.
 The significance of drinking water as voters’ priority has increased by 150% from 12% in 2017 to 30% in 2018. At the same time, the performance of the government on this issue declined from 2.79 to 2.52.
 The significance of better roads as voter’s priority has increased by 100% from 14% in 2017 to 28% in 2018. At the same time, the performance of the government on this issue declined from 3.1 to 2.41.
 Amongst the 32 states and UTs that were surveyed, in 29 of them, voters have given below average ratings to the government for its performance on all top 3 voters’ priorities at the state level. This is with the exception of Dadra and Nagar Haveli, Daman and Diu and Puducherry.
 Out of all the 8 Empowered Action Group (EAG) states, which are considered as most socio-economically backward, in seven states (Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Uttarakhand and Uttar Pradesh) better employment opportunities is the foremost voters’ priority.
 Drinking Water is the topmost voters’ priority in 3 States/UTs like Odisha, Karnataka and Daman and Diu.
Voting behaviour:
 As per All India Survey 2018, 75.11% voters disclosed that CM candidate was the most important reason behind voting for a particular candidate, followed by candidate’s party (71.32%) and the candidate (68.03%) himself/herself.
 It is distressing to see that for 41.34% voters, distribution of cash, liquor, gifts etc. was an important factor behind voting a particular candidate in an election.
 In relation to voting candidates with criminal antecedents, maximum number of voters (36.67%) felt that people vote for such candidates because they are unaware of his/her criminal records. 35.89% voters are also willing to vote for a candidate with criminal records if the candidate has done good work in the past.
 Although, 97.86% voters felt that candidates with criminal background should not be in Parliament or State Assembly, only 35.20% voters knew that they could get information on criminal records of the candidates.

Comments

Prof. Srinivasa Reddy Kunuthur said…
The governance of India is obligated to people to infuse and inculcate the spirit of nationalism on top most priority to enable them to realize that they are crucial constituent of the country and not out of the system of governance.
Whereas, the political parties keep on encashing on the basic instincts and weaknesses of people to bag their votes to win the elections either to grab or remain in political power. The tools invariably used are: Caste, religion, region, language, gender and freebies/subsidies, which eventually divide people forever thereby weakening the country's independence.

TRENDING

Buddhist shrines massively destroyed by Brahmanical rulers in "pre-Islamic" era: Historian DN Jha's survey

By Our Representative
Prominent historian DN Jha, an expert in India's ancient and medieval past, in his new book, "Against the Grain: Notes on Identity, Intolerance and History", in a sharp critique of "Hindutva ideologues", who look at the ancient period of Indian history as "a golden age marked by social harmony, devoid of any religious violence", has said, "Demolition and desecration of rival religious establishments, and the appropriation of their idols, was not uncommon in India before the advent of Islam".

RSS' 25,000 Shishu Mandirs 'follow' factory school model of Christian missionaries

By Bhabani Shankar Nayak*
The executive committee of the International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences (IUAES) recently decided to drop the KISS University in Odisha as the co-host of the World Anthropology Congress-2023. The decision is driven by the argument that KISS University is a factory school.

India must recognise: 4,085 km Himalayan borders are with Tibet, not China

By Tenzin Tsundue, Sandeep Pandey*
There has as been a cancerous wound around India’s Himalayan neck ever since India's humiliating defeat during the Chinese invasion of India in 1962. The recent Galwan Valley massacre has only added salt to the wound. It has come to this because, when China invaded the neighbouring country Tibet in 1950, India was in high romance with the newly-established communist regime under Mao Zedong after a bloody revolution.

August 22 to be observed as Apostasy Day: International coalition of ex-Muslim groups

By Our Representative
In a unique move, an international coalition of ex-Muslim organisations has decided to observe August 22, 2020 as the Apostasy Day. To be observed for “the abandonment or renunciation of religion”, the coalition, calling upon people to join the call, said, the decision to observe the Apostasy Day has been taken because of apostasy is “punishable by death in Afghanistan, Iran, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritania, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, UAE, and Yemen.”

Swami Vivekananda's views on caste and sexuality were 'painfully' regressive

By Bhaskar Sur*
Swami Vivekananda now belongs more to the modern Hindu mythology than reality. It makes a daunting job to discover the real human being who knew unemployment, humiliation of losing a teaching job for 'incompetence', longed in vain for the bliss of a happy conjugal life only to suffer the consequent frustration.

Time to give Covid burial, not suspend, World Bank's 'flawed' Doing Business ranking

By Maju Varghese*
On August 27, the World Bank came out with a statement suspending the Doing Business Report. The statement said that a number of irregularities have been reported regarding changes to the data in the Doing Business 2018 and Doing Business 2020 reports, published in October 2017 and 2019. The changes in the data were inconsistent with the Doing Business methodology.

Delhi riots: Cops summoning, grilling, intimidating young to give 'false' evidence

Counterview Desk
More than 440 concerned citizens have supported the statement issued by well-known bureaucrat-turned-human rights activist Harsh Mander ‘We will not be silenced’ which said that the communal riots in Delhi in February 2020 have not been caused by any conspiracy, as alleged by the Delhi Police, but by “hate speech and provocative statements made by a number of political leaders of the ruling party.”

WHO chief ignores India, cites Pak as one of 7 top examples in fight against Covid-19

By Our Representative
In a move that would cause consternation in India’s top policy makers in the Modi government, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, World Health Organization (WHO) director-general, has singled out Pakistan among seven countries that have set “examples” in investing in a healthier and safer future in order to fight the Covid-19 pandemic.

Tata Mundra: NGOs worry as US court rules World Bank can't be sued for 'damages'

By Kate Fried, Mir Jalal*
On August 24 evening, a federal court ruled that the World Bank Group cannot be sued for any damage caused by its lending, despite last year’s Supreme Court ruling in the same case that these institutions can be sued for their “commercial activity” in the United States.