Skip to main content

Beti Bachao, Beti Padhao? 60% funds used on publicity, 88% schools don't comply with RTE

Delhi National Capital Region girls speak about their woes 
By Mitra Ranjan*
India is a country which claims to have a culture of respecting women and girls since ages. But reality on the ground is entirely different, rather grim. Presently, girls are fighting for their right to birth and survival. They are deprived of literacy and education. They are forcibly pushed for early marriage and their safety and security have gone for toss.
Speaking on these lines at a media conference, jointly organized by the Right to Education (RTE) Forum Forum, Campaign Against Child Labour (CACL) and Alliance for the Right to Early Childhood Development (ARECD) at the Indian Women’s Press Corps, New Delhi, pointed towards failure of the slogan “Beti Bachao, Beti Padhao.
Addressing media on the occasion of 12th National Girl Child Day and the 1st International Day of Education,, Ambarish Rai, National Convener, RTE Forum said, “It’s imperative to know where the girls in India stand today after more than seven decades of being a free country. Situation is very pathetic on the ground. Girls are deprived of all of their fundamental rights, particularly education. We all of us have heard the drumbeating of ‘Beti Bachao, Beti Padhao’ by the government.”
He added, “But it is the government which has failed this programme. The total budget of this programme was Rs 100 crore. And we know the news that approximately 60 per cent of this fund has been wasted on publicity only. Remaining 40 crore is just farce and inadequate to provide education to girls of this country.”
Rai further said, “Children from 6-14 years of age in India have a right to free and quality education. Even after nearly nine years of the implementation of the Right to Education (RTE) Act, millions of girls are still out of school because of absence of female teachers, lack of separate toilets, lack of safety and security within and outside the schools.”
According to him, “Only 12 per cent schools in India are compliant with the RTE Act. On the top of this, under the pretext of rationalization, nearly 2 lakh schools have been closed down. Where do we stand on world’s education map?”
CACL’s Ashok Kumar, who also attached with ARECD, said, “There were 972 women per 1000 men in 1901 and now this figure slipped to 940 women per 1000 men in 2011. Now the question is where are the missing numbers?”
“The global average of female literacy rate is 79.7 per cent whereas in India, this figure is 65.46 per cent. In Kerala, female literacy rate is 92.07 per cent whereas in Bihar it is as low as 51.5 per cent. This kind of disparities and slackness is the real bottleneck for the betterment of girls”, he added.
Speakers pointed out that 27 per cent girls are married before reaching their 18th birthday. More than one third of adolescent girls in India are subjected to varied degree of sexual abuse including rape. “Can we justify our claim to be world’s fastest growing economy?”, they wondered.
Leaders of the three networks demanded complete implementation of the RTE Act, extension of the act to include all children from birth to 18 years of age, strengthening of the public education system and increased investment in girls’ education as the way forward to universalize girls’ access to free, safe and quality education.
Girls from different communities across Delhi National Capital Region (NCR) joined in to point towards huge barriers they faced in accessing quality and equitable education. Those who spoke included Shehnaz from Seemapuri, East Delhi, Lalita from Adarsh Nagar, Sonam and Shabnam from Nirantar, Madhu from Vasant Vihar, Anchal from Okhla along with some School Mangement Committee.
Some of the girls said how their names were cancelled without any information from their schools after a period of their absence. Anchal narrated about the adverse atmosphere in schools for differently abled students. Bhawani from Vasant Vihar added, she was forced to leave school in class 9 to take care of domestic chores.
---
*Media and Communication, RTE Forum

Comments

TRENDING

Ganga world's second most polluted river, Modi's Varanasi tops microplastics pollution

By Rajiv Shah  Will the new report by well-known elite NGO Toxics Link create a ripple in the powerful corridors of Delhi? Titled “Quantitative analysis of microplastics along River Ganga”, forwarded to Counterview, doesn’t just say that Ganga is the second most polluted river in the world, next only to Yangtze (China). It goes ahead to do a comparison of microplastics pollution in three cities shows Varanasi – the Lok Sabha constituency of Prime Minister Narendra Modi – is more polluted compared to Kanpur and Haridwar.

Madhya Pradesh tops India's 145 instances of 'anti-Christian atrocities' this year

Counterview Desk  A report prepared by the Religious Liberty Commission of the Evangelical Fellowship of India (EFI), founded in 1951 as the national alliance of evangelical Christians of the Protestant denomination, in its just-released report, “Hate and Targeted Violence against Christians in India: Half Yearly Report 2021”, has said that an analysis of 145 cases of violence it has documented against Christians, mainly by non-state actors, “stems from an environment of targeted hate.”

Demolition drive: Why aren't high-end hotels, farmhouses treated same way as Khorigaon?

By Our Representative A public hearing, sponsored by the civil rights group National Alliance of People’s Movements (NAPM) to hear the affected citizens of Khorigaon, off Faridabad, Delhi NCR, has seen local people complaining how their houses are being demolished even as the entire area was converted into a prison through heavy police deployment.

How real is Mamata challenge to Modi? Preparing for 2024 'khela hobey' moment

By Prof Ujjwal K Chowdhury*  Third time elected West Bengal Chief Minister, Mamata Banerjee is on a whirlwind tour of Delhi, meeting everyone who matters within and beyond the government, the Prime Minister, the President, some Cabinet ministers, Sonia and Rahul Gandhi, several other opposition leaders, et al.

Swami Vivekananda's views on caste and sexuality were 'painfully' regressive

By Bhaskar Sur* Swami Vivekananda now belongs more to the modern Hindu mythology than reality. It makes a daunting job to discover the real human being who knew unemployment, humiliation of losing a teaching job for 'incompetence', longed in vain for the bliss of a happy conjugal life only to suffer the consequent frustration.

How BSF, police, court turned Bangladeshi woman slave victim into accused in crime

Counterview Desk  Civil rights leader Kirity Roy has strongly objected to the manner in which the Border Security Force (BSF) , the police and the judiciary in West Bengal have treated a 35 years old Bangladeshi woman victim of human trafficking, who was subjected to sexual exploitation for 15 long years, has been declared guilty of violating the Foreigners Act, violating all human rights norms.

Buddhist shrines massively destroyed by Brahmanical rulers in "pre-Islamic" era: Historian DN Jha's survey

Nalanda mahavihara By Our Representative Prominent historian DN Jha, an expert in India's ancient and medieval past, in his new book , "Against the Grain: Notes on Identity, Intolerance and History", in a sharp critique of "Hindutva ideologues", who look at the ancient period of Indian history as "a golden age marked by social harmony, devoid of any religious violence", has said, "Demolition and desecration of rival religious establishments, and the appropriation of their idols, was not uncommon in India before the advent of Islam".

Khorigaon demolition: People being 'brutally' evicted, cops 'restricting' food, water

By Ishita Chatterjee, Neelesh Kumar, Manju Menon, Vimal Bhai* On July 23, the Faridabad Municipal Corporation told the Supreme Court that they have cleared 74 acres out of 150 acres. Despite the affidavit of the Municipal Corporation, the court, on the complaint of various litigants, that the arrangements for living, food etc. have not been made for the people. 

Covid impact on menstrual cycles? Young girls 'relapsing' back to unhygienic old-cloth rags

By Dr Sudeshna Roy*  Covid-19 pandemic has gripped the world in health and economic shock. Combating this public health crisis has diverted development resources earmarked for adolescents and the youth. India; having world’s second largest population; 1.38 crores as per UN mid-year 2020 estimation, also shelters the largest adolescents and young adult population, which at 243 million constitute 20% of the world’s 1.2 billion adolescent population.

Project launched to fight high malnutrition in Odisha's backward Malkangiri district

By Our Representative Odisha civil rights groups have launched a new project, which will cover 8,000 households under of Podia block in Odisha’s Malkangiri district in order to provide essential preventive medicine to the community through the trained village-based Swasthya Sathis (health workers) and fight malnutrition in the district’s rural areas.