Skip to main content

Women, old "neglected" by Indian healthcare system, which fails to take into account "societal needs": Lancet study

By By Rajiv Shah
Making a scathing critique of the prevailing social bias in collection of data on health in India, a recent study published in the well-known global health journal “Lancet” has said that “about 80% of patients visit a private practitioner, which they do at their own expense”, yet most “health-related data are obtained from public hospitals and public health-care service units.”
Pointing out that public facilities provide “only 20% of all outpatient care in India”, hence they do not provide “a true picture of the whole morbidity profile in India”, the study says, this is one reason why the most representative National Family Health Survey (NFHS), collects “little information about disease patterns”, and depends on “self-reports”.
Pointing out that this results in “under-reporting of disease patterns”, the study says, result is that health related data collected by the NFHS is confined to collecting facts on "fertility, infant and child mortality, contraception and family planning, maternal and child health, reproductive health, nutrition, and anaemia.”
Contrary to NFHS findings, the study, authored by a group of nine scholars led by Dr Sandeep Salvi, finds that, in India,  “respiratory symptoms were the leading cause of a visit to a health-care provider across India, accounting for about half of all patients and 65% of all child patients.”
It underlines, “Although infections of the upper and lower respiratory tract were among the leading causes of respiratory symptoms, asthma and COPD together captured under the category of obstructive airways diseases was the second most common diagnosis reported by primary health-care practitioners in India.”
The study also finds that “a fifth of patients with hypertension were younger than 40 years, indicating a high burden of young patients with hypertension in India and suggesting that blood pressures be routinely measured in young adults.”
It adds, “The diagnosis of hypertension was more commonly reported from cities and towns with a population greater than 1 million people than from those with a population less than 1 million, suggesting that hypertension is more common in overcrowded and urban places in India.”
The study is titled “Symptoms and medical conditions in 204,912 patients visiting primary health-care practitioners in India: a 1-day point prevalence study (the POSEIDON study)”, and has been published in December 2015 issue of “The Lancet”. It has been carried out in 880 cities and towns, identifying “the main conditions that lead a patient to visit a primary health-care practitioner.”
Pointing towards in-built social bias in the health system, the study says that “primary practitioners received a greater proportion of visits from male patients (54·1%)”, adding, “This gender bias remained throughout all age groups, including children, adults in the reproductive years, and older people, and was constant across all regions of the country.”
Revealing out that “the gender difference was even larger in patients younger than 18 years (57% males)”, the study regrets that “7·9% of patients who visited a primary health-care provider in our study were older than 60 years.” It comments, “The proportion of people older than 60 years is 8% in India. Since older people will suffer from age-related ailments, our findings probably reflect a reduced opportunity to seek health care compared with that for younger people.”
The study believes, “Other than infirmity, we speculate that economic reasons prevent older people from seeking health care, since 80% of health care in India is paid for by the individual, rather than the state.” It adds, “Since women and older people have greater health needs than the rest of the population, our findings might be describing a widespread social inequality in India.”
Suggesting that all this suggests health care in India is “not organised in accordance with societal needs”, the study comments, it “faces several challenges, such as socioeconomic inequality, inappropriate distribution of government subsidies, low emphasis on preventive services at all levels, and a lack of effective national programmes or policies for many common illnesses.”

Comments

TRENDING

A Hindu alternative to Valentine's Day? 'Shiv-Parvati was first love marriage in Universe'

By Rajiv Shah*   The other day, I was searching on Google a quote on Maha Shivratri which I wanted to send to someone, a confirmed Shiv Bhakt, quite close to me -- with an underlying message to act positively instead of being negative. On top of the search, I chanced upon an article in, imagine!, a Nashik Corporation site which offered me something very unusual. 

'Wedding of the century': What does Mukesh Ambani want to prove by such extravaganza?

By NS Venkataraman*  Mukesh  Ambani,   a renowned Indian industrialist who is said to be the richest person in India and  one of the richest persons in the world,   has just now conducted the wedding celebration of  his son in Mumbai,   with unheard level of lavishness in India.

'28% rise in sedition cases': Top global NGO alliance rates India's civil space 'repressed'

By Rajiv Shah Rating India's civic space as repressed , Civicus, a global civil society alliance, in its new report submitted to the UN Human Rights Committee (UNHRC) on the state of civic space in the country has said that the use of sedition law against the Modi government’s critics continues. "Under the government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, sedition cases have increased by 28 per cent with over 500 cases against more than 7,000 people", it says.

'Anti-poor stand': Even British wouldn't reduce Railways' sleeper and general coaches

By Anandi Pandey, Sandeep Pandey*  Probably even the British, who introduced railways in India, would not have done what the Bhartiya Janata Party government is doing. The number of Sleeper and General class coaches in various trains are surreptitiously and ominously disappearing accompanied by a simultaneous increase in Air Conditioned coaches. In the characteristic style of BJP government there was no discussion or debate on this move by the Indian Railways either in the Parliament or outside of it. 

Swami Vivekananda's views on caste and sexuality were 'painfully' regressive

By Bhaskar Sur* Swami Vivekananda now belongs more to the modern Hindu mythology than reality. It makes a daunting job to discover the real human being who knew unemployment, humiliation of losing a teaching job for 'incompetence', longed in vain for the bliss of a happy conjugal life only to suffer the consequent frustration.

How embracing diversity enriched my life, brought profound sense of joy

By Mike Ghouse*  If you can shed the bias towards others, you'll love the connections with every human that God or his systems have created. This gives a sense of freedom and brings meaning and joy to life. Embracing and respecting how people dress, eat, and practice their beliefs becomes an enriching experience.

Banned Maoist party protests in Jharkhand, Chhattisgarh, claims support across globe

By Harsh Thakor*  Despite being a banned and designated as terrorist organisation under the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act since 2009, the Communist Party of India (Maoist) is said to have successfully implemented a one-day bandh across Kolhan division in Jharkhand on July 10th, with repurcussions in the neighbouring Chhattisgarh. The bandh was called to protest against alleged police brutality in the Kolhan-Saranda region.

Post-poll mob lynching spree, bulldozer justice: NAPM seeks united resistance

Counterview Desk  Condemning what it calls "the horrific spree of mob lynchings across the country after the Lok Sabha election results", India's premier civil society network, National Alliance of People’s Movements (NAPM), has called for "united resistance" against "hateful communal politics, mob lynching of religious minorities and caste-based oppression".

Hindutva economics? 12% decline in manufacturing enterprises, 22.5% fall in employment

By Bhabani Shankar Nayak*  The messiah of Hindutva politics, Narendra Modi, assumed office as the Prime Minister of India on May 26, 2014. He pledged to transform the Indian economy and deliver a developed nation with prosperous citizens. However, despite Modi's continued tenure as the Prime Minister, his ambitious electoral promises seem increasingly elusive.