Skip to main content

Citing CAG, budget analyst says, Gujarat govt figures on dropout, enrollment in primary schools are "false"

CAG figures quoted by Jethmalani
By Our Representative
Contradicting Gujarat government claims – as reflected in a Government of India book, “Elementary Education in India”, of June 2014 – that dropout rate of lower primary schools went down from 2.99 per cent in 2010-11 to 0.74 per cent in 2012-13, latest report of India’s Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) suggests that the dropout rate was, actually, 19.48 per cent in 2013. CAG confines itself to analysing enrollment in government schools over the years, even as surveying as many as 300 schools to identify infrastructure reasons behind poor enrollment.
Revealing this, Mahender Jethmalani, who heads Pathey, an independent non-profit budget analysis centre in Ahmedabad, told a seminar organized by a high-profile NGO, Child Rights and You (CRY), “The huge difference between the government data and that of the CAG report should be challenged appropriately.”
Jethmalani, who made a detailed presentation on the wide gap between state data and CAG observations, said, the data collected by CAG suggest as many as 9,76,890 children were enrolled in class one in 2008‐09, but the number of students who reached class five was 7,86,590 in 2012‐13, suggesting a dropout of 1,90,300. This comes to 19.48 per cent, as against the state government claim of just 0.79 per cent dropout.
The figures further suggest that in 2010-11, as many as 758971 children enrolled themselves in class VI, but 6,50,648 remained in class VIII, which means that 1,08,323, or 14.27 per cent children further dropped out.
The data also suggest that there was a progressive decline in the number of children who enrolled themselves every year. Thus, 9,76,890 children were enrolled in class 1 in 2008-09, while the enrollment was 7,68,980 in 2012-13. The figures, in fact, suggest each year there was a progressive decline in enrollment.
Jethmalani said, “The drop in the rate of enrolment in government schools and high dropout rate from these schools could be attributed to in adequate infrastructural facilities and basic amenities and teachers in these schools.” He added, CAG cited reasons like “lack of all weather building schools, classrooms, toilets, drinking water, play grounds, compound walls, teachers etc.”, as the main reason behind the dropout and fall in enrollment.
Source: CAG's report on local bodies of Gujarat in Jethmalani's presentation

According to Jethamalani, CAG’s audit, conducted in 10 district, namely Ahmedabad, Anand, Banaskantha, Jamnagar, Junagadh, Kachchh, Kheda, Porbandar, Rajkot and Surrendranagar, suggested that of the 300 schools surveyed, “48 schools did not have their building and 56 school building were dilapidated and 4 out of 10 districts checked 14 schools did not have their own buildings.”
CAG further found that schools without adequate class rooms 3,146 schools (10%) out of total schoos 31545, were functioning without adequate class rooms as on July, 201). In 397 primary schools and 181 upper primary schools only one class room each was available, and in 2,568 upper primary schools only two class rooms per school were available. “The percentage of inadequacy of class rooms in the state ranged from 1% in Surat from 53% Jamnagar”, Jethmalani said.
Then, there were schools without separate toilets for boys and girls. “The CAG audit report noticed that out of the 300 schools it surveyed, 26 schools did not have separate toilets 9%). Then, 45 of schools (15%) visited had un‐usable toilets, in 35 schools, water was not available in the toilet, water connection was not provided.
Further, “17 schools did not have drinking water facility, 105 schools were not provided water purifiers, in 53 schools water purifiers were not working , 175 schools were lacking the safe and drinking water facilities”, Jethmalani said, adding, CAG only corroborates the findings of CRY (click HERE to read).

Comments

TRENDING

Gujarat refusal to observe Maulana Azad's birthday as Education Day 'discriminatory'

By Our Representative
The Gujarat government decision not to celebrate the National Education Day on !monday has gone controversial. Civil society organizations have particularly wondered whether the state government is shying away from the occasion, especially against the backdrop of "deteriorating" level of education in Gujarat.

Rushdie, Pamuk, 260 writers tell Modi: Aatish episode casts chill on public discourse

Counterview Desk
As many as 260 writers, journalists, artists, academics and activists across the world, including Salman Rushdie, British Indian novelist, Orhan Pamuk, Turkish novelist and recipient of the 2006 Nobel Prize in literature, and Margaret Atwood, Canadian poet and novelist, have called upon Prime Minister Narendra Modi to review the decision to strip British Indian writer Aatish Taseer of his overseas Indian citizenship.

Visually challenged lady seeks appointment with Gujarat CM, is 'unofficially' detained

By Pankti Jog*
It was a usual noon of November 10. I got a phone call on our Right to Information (RTI) helpline No 9924085000 from Ranjanben of Khambhat, narrating her “disgraceful” experience after she had requested for an appointment with Gujarat chief minister Vijay Rupani. She wanted to meet Rupani, on tour of the Khambhat area in Central Gujarat as part of his Janvikas Jumbesh (Campaign for Development).

Violent 'Ajodhya' campaign in 1840s after British captured Kabul, destroyed Jama Masjid

Counterview Desk  Irfan Ahmad, professor at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity, Göttingen, Germany, and author of “Islamism and Democracy in India” (Princeton University Press, 2009), short-listed for the 2011 International Convention of Asian Scholars Book Prize for the best study in Social Sciences, in his "initial thoughts" on the Supreme Court judgment on the Babri-Jam Janmaboomi dispute has said, while order was “lawful”, it was also “awful.”

There may have been Buddhist stupa at Babri site during Gupta period: Archeologist

By Rajiv Shah
A top-notch archeologist, Prof Supriya Varma, who served as an observer during the excavation of the Babri Masjid site in early 2000s along with another archeologist, Jaya Menon, has controversially stated that not only was there "no temple under the Babri Masjid”, if one goes “beyond” the 12th century to 4th to 6th century, i.e. the Gupta period, “there seems to be a Buddhist stupa.”

VHP doesn't represent all Hindus, Sunni Waqf Board all Muslims: NAPM on SC ruling

Counterview Desk
India's top civil rights network, National Alliance of People’s Movements (NAPM), even as describing the Supreme Court's Ayodhya judgement unjust, has said, it is an "assault on the secular fabric of the Constitution". In a statement signed by top social workers and activists, NAPM said, "The judgement conveys an impression to Muslims that, despite being equal citizens of the country, their rights are not equal before the law."

Would those charged for illegally demolishing Babri now manage a new Ram temple?

By Fr Cedric Prakash SJ*
The long-awaited verdict on the contentious issue of the disputed land in Ayodhya was finally delivered by the Supreme Court on November 9, 2019. The judgement has come after a 70-year-old conflict filled with acrimony, divisiveness, hate and violence between sections of the Hindus and Muslims of the country. At the core of the issue was the Ram Mandir – Babri Masjid dispute: was there a temple on the place where the Masjid was built? To whom should the land be given to?