Skip to main content

Samerth study points towards poor state of Integrated Child Development Scheme in Gujarat's minority area

Counterview Desk
A study by Samerth, a non-government organisation working among the backward sections of Muslim population in Ahmedabad, has found that there is not just a tremendous shortage of anganvadis among the minority pockets, especially in the Juhapura area, but also whatever anganvadis operate they are extremely poorly equipped to take care of small children. Part of the Integrated Child Development Scheme (ICDS) launched by the Government of India, the areas where the study was carried out had a very high percentage of children, forming about 39.5 per cent of the population.
Even then, the study said, little was being done in the direction of child care. None of the anganvadis maintain the norm of 25 children in students in the age group three to six, with the result that for a population of 2,440 children there should be 100 anganbadis. “At present there are 36 operating”, it says, adding, “Thus, there is a requirement of 64 new anganvadis in the area of study. Close to 1,000 children are completely out of the ICDS programme and this is an alarming number. This also implies that for 60,000-odd population we need 100 anganvadis and therefore for every set of a 600 people population we require one anganvadi."
The survey suggests that eight per cent of the anganvadis do not open regularly, while the average number of children in the anganvadis comes to 40 on an average. On an average 60 per cent of registered children attend regularly, and only 10 per cent of anganbavis have an attendance above 90 per cent. Then, while only 18 per cent provide the healthy meal, 71 per cent falter both with regard to quality and quantity. Also, 18 per cent of the anganvadis do not provide food to pregnant women and lactating mothers, and 37 per cent do not provide healthy meals to adolescent girls.
The study further found that there were no anganvadi which provided toys to children to play with, eight per cent of them do not have the provision of clean drinking water, a whopping 21 per cent do not have the provision of a toilet, 20 per cent have no kitchen equipment, while another 26 per cent access the facility at a private house to cook food.
Samerth carried out the study in order to take a view of the area for getting an idea of the quantity and quality of services available in the areas. The families surveyed were mainly “socially and economically backward communities with professions such as vegetable -- fruit cart, rickshaw driver, painter, snack cart, masonry work, paddle rickshaw puller, garage, car driver, tailor, factory worker, truck driver, household worker, bus conductor, butcher shop, welding work, plumber, job in a supermarket etc”, it said. Also, majority of the population was Muslim and many of them were ravaged by the riots of 2002.
The study observed, “In terms of infrastructure the area has no government water supply or roads. All provisions have been privately constructed. Shady land deals are the norm here and land prices are very high as the mafias make the most of the illiterate and unaware populace. In terms of anganvadis the area does not have adequate number of them, and same is the case in government schools as well. The existing schools have poor facilities when it comes to furniture and teaching aids. Some even have much fewer classrooms than needed.”
The study added, “Anganvadi workers and school teachers were found to be untrained and the communities had little information about the right to education (RTE) Act, one reason why they could not assert the formulation their demands for new anganvadi centres from the government. A lot of peace initiatives needed to be taken as religious fundamentalism has strong roots in the work area. At the same time awareness about female education needs to be continuously spread as the larger proportion of illiterates and dropouts are girls.”

Comments

Anonymous said…
This if not fare! The government should ensure that the development programmes should reach to all the sections of our society including the marginalized.

TRENDING

'Enough evidence': Covid vaccines impacted women's reproductive health

By Deepika*  In 2024, the news outlets have suddenly started reporting about covid vaccine side effects in a very extensive manner. Sadly, the damage is already done.

A Hindu alternative to Valentine's Day? 'Shiv-Parvati was first love marriage in Universe'

By Rajiv Shah*   The other day, I was searching on Google a quote on Maha Shivratri which I wanted to send to someone, a confirmed Shiv Bhakt, quite close to me -- with an underlying message to act positively instead of being negative. On top of the search, I chanced upon an article in, imagine!, a Nashik Corporation site which offered me something very unusual. 

Dadi, poti discuss 'injustice' under 10 yr Modi rule: Video campaign goes viral

By Our Representative  Watan Ki Raah Mein, a civil society campaign of the Samvidhan Bachao Nagrik Abhiyan, has released a short video conversation on social media of an exchange of letters between a dadi and her poti discussing poverty, unemployment, corruption and women’s safety. The letters also raise the question of  suppression of our fundamental rights of speech, expression and justice. 

US 'frustrated' with India’s discomfort: Maritime exercise in South China Sea

By Vijay Prashad*  In early April 2024, the navies of four countries -- Australia, Japan, the Philippines, and the United States -- held a maritime exercise in the South China Sea. Australia’s Warramunga, Japan’s Akebono, the Philippines’ Antonio Luna, and the United States’ Mobile worked together in these waters to strengthen their joint abilities and -- as they said in a joint statement  -- to “uphold the right to freedom of navigation and overflight and respect for maritime rights under international law.” 

'Uncertainty in Iran': Raisi brokered crucial Chabahar Port deal with India

By Pranjal Pandey*  Ebrahim Raisi, the Iranian President, and the country’s foreign minister were tragically found deceased on May 20, 2024, shortly after their helicopter crashed in foggy conditions. In response, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei swiftly appointed a relatively unknown vice president as the interim leader.

Informal, outdoor workers 'excluded': Govt of India's excessive heat policies

Counterview Desk  Top civil rights network, National Alliance of People's Movements (NAPM), has demanded urgent government action to protect millions of outdoor workers from extreme heat and heatwaves, insisting declaration of heatwaves as climatic disaster.

Desist from academic censorship, stop threatening scholars: Letter to ICMR

Counterview Desk  In a letter to the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) director, the Universal Health Organisation (UHO) which consists of prominent health experts, has insisted that the Government of India’s top medical research agency should lead high quality research on vaccine safety and “desist from academic censorship”.

WHO move can 'enable' India to detain citizens, restrict freedom, control media

Counterview Desk  In an an open letter to Prime Minister Narendra Modi, with copies to concerned Cabinet ministers, bureaucrats and MPs,  health rights network  People’s Alliance for Public Health (PAPH alias JanSwasthya Morcha), has urged that India should not be a signatory to the World Health Organization ( WHO) Pandemic Agreement and Amendments to the  International Health Regulations (IHR) 2005  to be adopted at the 77th World Health Assembly in Geneva from 27th May to 1st June, 2024.

Vaccine nationalism? Covaxin isn't safe either, perhaps it's worse: Experts

By Rajiv Shah  I was a little awestruck: The news had already spread that Astrazeneca – whose Indian variant Covishield was delivered to nearly 80% of Indian vaccine recipients during the Covid-19 era – has been withdrawn by the manufacturers following the admission by its UK pharma giant that its Covid-19 vector-based vaccine in “rare” instances cause TTS, or “thrombocytopenia thrombosis syndrome”, which lead to the blood to clump and form clots. The vaccine reportedly led to at least 81 deaths in the UK.