Skip to main content

NAPM extends support to Indian, Aussie citizen groups 'opposing' Adani ventures

#StopAdani action in Australia 
Counterview Desk 
The civil rights network, National Alliance of People’s Movements (NAPM), extending solidarity to the global campaign by the Youth Action to Stop Adani (YAStA), held in recently in Australia and India, has said that the effort was to bring more attention to the struggle aboriginal, indigenous peoples, farmers, working class and other oppressed communities against allegedly anti-people multinational corporate conglomerates.
Claiming that the campaign involved involved “thousands of young people”, NAPM said in a statement, “YAStA made it possible to hear voices that are central to the ground resistance against Adani’s excesses: people from Godda (Jharkhand), Kattupalli (Tamil Nadu), Goa, Mundra (Gujarat), Vizhinjam (Kerala), Kavalappara (Kerala), from the Farmers’ Protests (Delhi), and Juru Country (Queensland, Australia), united by their struggle against corporate oppression.”

Excerpts:

The ongoing historic farmers’ movement in India has made plain and apparent the deep corporate-state nexus inherent to the neoliberal structure of our political economy and how the Adanis and Ambanis in particular are at the heart of this ‘structural pandemic’.
At this juncture, it becomes pertinent to emphasise on many of the local struggles that have been and are being carried out across the country and the world -- invisibilized by big pro-establishment media houses and ignored by the complacent sections of society.
Notably, Adani, one of the largest multinational corporate giants, has expanded its operations exponentially, parallel to Narendra Modi becoming the Prime Minister of India in 2014 and has been making forays into every sector, ever since.
Even as millions of working and middle class people lost jobs and the world witnessed an unprecedented livelihood and health crisis, corporates like Adani, which represent the deeper malaise plaguing our planet, became richer by over 21.5 billion dollars during the 2020 Covid lockdown.
This is the maximum revenue jump, in comparison to all other domestic corporate houses. For billionaires and conglomerates, the pandemic has been an opportunity to further exploit and trample upon the rights of the marginalised communities all over the world.
They are further aided by the ruling political mafias and state apparatus that have pulled no stop in utilising every means available -- from legislation to brute police violence -- to suppress people struggles and campaigns.
Adani’s ventures like mega ports, coal mines or other carbon-intensive industries, pay no heed to the ‘collateral damage’ that they seem to cause. Agricultural lands, sensitive ecosystems like coasts, forests and wetlands, indigenous ways of life, the dignity and rights of the working class are all deemed necessary ‘sacrifices’ in this quest for unbridled development.
Development for whom and at what cost is a question that mass movements of this country have been posing for decades now, with little change in the broader capitalist paradigm that is only aggravating the global climate crisis and affecting the most vulnerable populations.
Recognising the need to challenge exploitative corporates wielding enormous economic and political clout, without any accountability, youth groups from around the world have joined hands and organised a global week of action against Adani, amplifying local struggles and creating awareness amongst different sections of society about the need to stand in solidarity with the peoples’ movements and resist conglomerates like Adani.
Through ‘Pass the Mic: Unheard Voices from Adani Sites’, YAStA made it possible to hear voices that are central to the ground resistance against Adani’s excesses: people from Godda (Jharkhand), Kattupalli (Tamil Nadu), Goa, Mundra (Gujarat), Vizhinjam (Kerala), Kavalappara (Kerala), from the Farmers’ Protests (Delhi), and Juru Country (Queensland, Australia), united by their struggle against corporate oppression.
Adani, one of the largest multinational corporate giants, has expanded its operations exponentially, parallel to Modi becoming PM
They make a compelling case for mainstream mass media to start paying attention to their struggles. Other events, including a film festival and a talk on climate fiction, effectively engaged culture as a powerful tool in spreading the stories of resistance and the importance of addressing environmental/ecological destruction.
NAPM fully supports the struggles of affected communities and citizens’ action groups resisting many of Adani’s ventures including:
  • The adivasi Gram Sabhas in Hasdeo Arand region of Chhattisgarh, challenging the massive coal block allocations in the Schedule-V region.
  • Adivasi and other farmers of Hazaribagh in Jharkhand, already impacted by severe coal mining, now resisting the allocation of Gondulpara coal block to Adani.
  • Adivasis of Godda in Jharkhand who were subject to deceitful land acquisition for Adani’s Power Plant.
  • The fisher people of Thiruvallur and Chennai, Tamil Nadu who are waging a tough battle against the 53,000 crore Kattupalli port expansion project to save their livelihoods & the Pulicat Lake from massive sea erosion.
  • The fisher communities and other locals in Vizhinjam, Kerala who have already faced land loss and severe impacts on their coastal livelihoods due to destructive dredging by Adani’s container port.
  • Farmers, salt pan workers and fisher people affected by the Adani and Tata power plants in Mundra, Gujarat.
  • Communities in Goa who are resisting the double-tracking of railway line, highway expansion and a new power line right through the pristine Mollem National Park and the Bhagwan Mahavir Sanctuary for coal-transportation, to benefit multiple corporates.
  • Wangan and Jagalingou Aboriginal peoples and citizens struggle against the proposed Carmichael coal mine and port in Australia, for which Adani is also trying to secure a 500 crore from State Bank of India.
As we continue our struggles against corporate loot and neo-liberal assault, we welcome this significant initiative by youth groups and acknowledge the critical need for building solidarity across borders, especially when corporatisation is transcending borders with impunity and is threatening all of life and democratic structures.
---
Click here for signatories

Comments

TRENDING

'Flawed' argument: Gandhi had minimal role, naval mutinies alone led to Independence

Counterview Desk Reacting to a Counterview  story , "Rewiring history? Bose, not Gandhi, was real Father of Nation: British PM Attlee 'cited'" (January 26, 2016), an avid reader has forwarded  reaction  in the form of a  link , which carries the article "Did Atlee say Gandhi had minimal role in Independence? #FactCheck", published in the site satyagrahis.in. The satyagraha.in article seeks to debunk the view, reported in the Counterview story, taken by retired army officer GD Bakshi in his book, “Bose: An Indian Samurai”, which claims that Gandhiji had a minimal role to play in India's freedom struggle, and that it was Netaji who played the crucial role. We reproduce the satyagraha.in article here. Text: Nowadays it is said by many MK Gandhi critics that Clement Atlee made a statement in which he said Gandhi has ‘minimal’ role in India's independence and gave credit to naval mutinies and with this statement, they concluded the whole freedom struggle.

BSF should take full responsibility for death of 4 kids in West Bengal: Rights defender

By Kirity Roy*  One is deeply disturbed and appalled by the callous trench-digging by BSF in Chetnagachh village under Daspara Gram Panchayat, Chopra, North Dinajpur District, West Bengal that has claimed the lives of four children. Along the entire stretch of Indo-Bangladesh border of West Bengal instead of guarding the actual border delineated by the international border pillars, BSF builds fences and digs trenches well inside the Indian territory, passing through villages and encroaching on private lands, often without due clearance or consent. 

A Hindu alternative to Valentine's Day? 'Shiv-Parvati was first love marriage in Universe'

By Rajiv Shah*   The other day, I was searching on Google a quote on Maha Shivratri which I wanted to send to someone, a confirmed Shiv Bhakt, quite close to me -- with an underlying message to act positively instead of being negative. On top of the search, I chanced upon an article in, imagine!, a Nashik Corporation site which offered me something very unusual. 

Students, lawyers, professors detained in Delhi for demonstrating in support of farmers

By Our Representative  About 25 protestors, belonging to the civil rights network, Campaign Against State Repression (CASR), a coalition of over 40 organisations, were detained at Jantar Mantar for holding a demonstration in support of the farmers' stir on Friday. Those detained included students, lawyers and professors, including Prof Nandita Narain and Prof N Sachin. 

Social justice day amidst 'official neglect' of salt pan workers in Little Rann of Kutch

By Prerana Pamkar*  In India’s struggle for Independence, the Salt Satyagraha stands as a landmark movement and a powerful symbol of nonviolent resistance. Led by Mahatma Gandhi, countless determined citizens walked from Sabarmati Ashram to Dandi in Gujarat. However, the Gujarat which witnessed the power of the common Indian during the freedom struggle is now in the throes of another significant movement: this time it is seeking to free salt pan workers from untenable working conditions in the Little Rann of Kutch (LRK).

How GMOs would destroy non-GMO crops: Aruna Rodrigues' key submissions in SC

Counterview Desk The introduction of Bt and HT crops will harm the health of 1 billion Indians and their animals, believes Aruna Rodrigues, who has made some 60 submissions to the Supreme Court (SC) during the last 20 years. As lead petitioner who filed Public Interest Litigation in 2005, during a spate of intense hearings, which ended on 18 January 2024, she fought in the Apex Court to prevent the commercialization of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in Indian agriculture. 

Jallianwala massacre: Why Indian govt hasn't ever officially sought apology from UK

By Manjari Chatterjee Miller*  The king of the Netherlands, Willem-Alexander, apologized in July 2023 for his ancestors’ role in the colonial slave trade. He is not alone in expressing remorse for past wrongs. In 2021, France returned 26 works of art seized by French colonial soldiers in Africa – the largest restitution France has ever made to a former colony. In the same year, Germany officially apologized for its 1904-08 genocide of the Herero and Nama people of Namibia and agreed to fund reconstruction and development projects in Namibia. .

Will Budget 2024 help empower city govts, make them India's growth engines?

By Soumyadip Chattopadhyay, Arjun Kumar* Cities in India are envisioned as engines of growth. Any meaningful long-term vision for India would be incomplete without planning for the cities and quite rightly, urbanization is considered as one of the country’s top developmental challenges. Realization of full potential of cities depends crucially on their ability to provide ‘enabling’ environment especially in terms of sustained provision of a wide range of urban infrastructure and services.

Interpreting UAPA bail provisions: Is Supreme Court setting the clock back?

By Kavita Srivastava*, Dr V Suresh** The Supreme Court in its ruling on 7th February, 2024 in   `Gurvinder Singh v State of Punjab’ held that its own well-developed jurisprudence that "Bail is the rule and jail the exception" will not apply to those charged under the UAPA.

Buddhist shrines were 'massively destroyed' by Brahmanical rulers: Historian DN Jha

Nalanda mahavihara By Our Representative Prominent historian DN Jha, an expert in India's ancient and medieval past, in his new book , "Against the Grain: Notes on Identity, Intolerance and History", in a sharp critique of "Hindutva ideologues", who look at the ancient period of Indian history as "a golden age marked by social harmony, devoid of any religious violence", has said, "Demolition and desecration of rival religious establishments, and the appropriation of their idols, was not uncommon in India before the advent of Islam".