Skip to main content

"Fudging" data and "misinterpreting" them are now part of Modi's and Jaitley's nature

By Mohan Guruswamy*
The tale of King Canute holds a salutary lesson to our Prime Minister. Canute set his throne by the seashore and commanded the incoming tide to halt and not wet his feet and robes. Yet continuing to rise as usual the tide dashed over his feet and legs without respect to his royal person. Then the king leapt backwards, saying: 'Let all men know how empty and worthless is the power of kings, for there is none worthy of the name, but He whom heaven, earth, and sea obey by eternal laws.'
Like the seas, economies too cannot be ordered about. Any stopping of the rising waters requires long term and carefully constructed plans for dikes, sea walls and water concourses. This requires a time frame our leaders do not have the luxury of enjoying. So they create illusions that they can sell to the voting citizen consumer. Our Modiji is the master of illusion.
The post facto boost of 2.2% given to GDP enabled the Modi government to claim to have restored growth to close to 7% after the dismal 4.7% in the last UPA year. But even this didn’t help in sustaining the illusion of rapid growth that the Modi regime was trying to create.
The problem was that even this was not working and nominal GDP – the GDP before adjusting for inflation – was falling. It came down to 5.2%, but the Modi government got a windfall in the form of a deflation of about 2.2%. So the real GDP became 7.4% with the 2.2% boost it gave itself earlier that year. This enabled it to stake the claim of being the “fastest growing major economy in the world”. It was just statistical legerdemain.
In the real world, nominal growth matters much more than the inflation-adjusted real growth. To a firm’s revenue, whether from realizations from current sales or projections for future, cash flows and investments, real growth hardly matters. Nominal growth matters for the government too because tax revenues also are affected by deflation. The sharp decline in direct tax collections gave this away, but Modi and Jaitely are not ones to be bothered with such niceties and accuracies. To them it is all about creating a spin and sustaining it. This is a habit that persists. Fudging data and then misinterpreting them is now a part of their nature.
To compound matters, falling revenues also began to impact job creation and the mood of gloom and doom began to infect the public mind again. So in November 2016 Narendra Modi reached into his bag of tricks and pulled out another bunny. He went in for a ban of Rs 500 and Rs 1000 notes.
This was not a demonetization as is commonly understood by economists. It was a straight forward, albeit a somewhat draconian, note exchange scheme, but Modi is nothing without the drama. He termed it demonetization. Demonetization is described as “the act of stripping a currency unit of its status as legal tender. It occurs whenever there is a change of national currency: The current form or forms of money is pulled from circulation and retired, often to be replaced with new notes or coins”. 
The condition that usually forces demonetization is hyperinflation. And here we were experiencing deflation. But Narendra Modi does not burden himself with concern for terminological accuracy.
It was hailed by the government’s drumbeaters as a stroke of Modi’s genius that will result in a bonanza of Rs 3-4 lakh crore to the RBI. But by taking out that much money from the market, Narendra Modi inflicted a huge pain on an economy where 98% of all transactions accounting for 68% of the value are in cash. At any given time about 150 million workers in the informal sector are daily wage earners and are still paid in cash. 
With the abrupt sucking out of 86% of the cash, it was this cohort who bore the brunt of the assault. The vacuuming of the cash led to huge job losses and tens of millions just went back to their villages. The economic costs have been estimated to be at least Rs 225,000 crores or 1.5% of GDP that year. 
It cost another Rs 40,000 crore to print new notes, some even in China we now hear, recalibrate ATMs and counting machines, and transport the cash, while people stood patiently in lines to get some of their own money back from banks. Over a hundred died in the waiting.
The other big bang reform undertaken by Narendra Modi and announced in a dramatic midnight speech in Parliament was the Goods and Services Tax (GST), a tax regime which he was singularly opposed to as the CM of Gujarat and which he thwarted. There can be not much argument in favor of the old regime, which leaked like a sieve and gave plenty of scope for corruption. But in the hurry to get the demonetization albatross off his back, Modi hurried through with this. The lack of preparation shows. 
Instead of a two-tiered system, we have a cumbersome five-tiered system. Since its launch it has been amended about 200 times. Instead of simplicity the new GST regime spread chaos. One thing is commonly accepted, that is small businesses across the country, which together employ 110 million persons and contribute a third of the national economy are hurting. 
According to estimates by the well-regarded Centre for Monitoring Indian Economy, Mumbai, nearly five million workers lost their jobs over the past year. India's unemployment rate rose to 6.4% in August from 4.1% in July last year despite an additional 17 million people joining the workforce.
But the Prime Minister blithely keeps repeating that his Mudra program is created employment for as many as seven million people in 2018. Modi says: “This data of seven million jobs is not like building castles in the air. It has been calculated by an independent agency on the basis of the Employees Provident Fund Organization figures."
Now consider this. The government gave no budget for directly financing PMMY loans to businesses. It also gave no budget to Mudra for refinancing loans to other financial institutions. Mudra has a corpus of Rs 10,000 crore allocated by RBI from priority sector lending shortfall. 
Till March 31, 2017, Mudra drew Rs 8,125 crores from that corpus, sanctioned Rs.7492 crores (2015-17) and had an outstanding refinance portfolio of Rs 6,113.87 crore. However, total loans counted as Mudra stands at Rs 3.17 lakh crore. This erroneously gives an impression that Rs 3.17 lakh crore in new financing has been made available by the government.
The problem for Modi is how the government should go about improving its investment to GDP ratio, which in turn depends on the savings to GDP ratio? The record here is truly depressing. India reached a high of close to 41% in 2007. Since then it has been falling year after year and is now at 30.2%. 
The investment to gross domestic product (GDP) ratio (a measure of what part of the overall economy does investment form) peaked in 2007 at 35.6 per cent. It has been falling ever since and in 2017, it had stood at 26.4 per cent. No other country in the world has gone through such a huge investment bust, during the same period. 
A fall in the investment to GDP ratio also suggests that enough jobs and employment opportunities are not being created. A recent estimate made by the Centre for Monitoring Indian Economy suggests that in 2017, two million jobs were created for 11.5 million Indians who joined the labor force during the year. This is the reality that Modi needs to come back to.
---
*Well-known public policy expert. Contact: mohanguru@gmail.com. Source: Author's Facebook timeline

Comments

TRENDING

Girl child education: 20 major states 'score' better than Gujarat, says GoI report

By Rajiv Shah
A Government of India report, released last month, has suggested that “model” Gujarat has failed to make any progress vis-à-vis other states in ensuring that girls continue to remain enrolled after they leave primary schools. The report finds that, in the age group 14-17, Gujarat’s 71% girls are enrolled at the secondary and higher secondary level, which is worse than 20 out of 22 major states for which data have been made available.

Savarkar in Ahmedabad "declared support" to two-nation theory in 1937, followed by Jinnah three years later

By Our Representative
One of the top freedom fighters whom BJP and Prime Minister Narendra Modi revere the most, Vinayak Damodar Savarkar, was also a great supporter of the two nation theory for India, one for Hindus another for Muslims, claims a new expose on the man who is also known to be the original proponent of the concept of Hindutva.

Congress 'promises' cancellation of Adani power project: Jharkhand elections

Counterview Desk
Pointing out that people's issues take a backseat in Jharkhand's 2019 assembly elections, the state's civil rights organization, the Jharkhand Janadhikar Mahasabha, a coalition of activists and people’s organisations, has said that political parties have largely ignored in their electoral manifestos the need to implement the fifth schedule of the Constitution in a predominantly tribal district.

Hindutva founders 'borrowed' Nazi, fascist idea of one flag, one leader, one ideology

By Shamsul Islam*
With the unleashing of the reign of terror by the RSS/BJP rulers against working-class, peasant organizations, women organizations, student movements, intellectuals, writers, poets and progressive social/political activists, India also witnessed a series of resistance programmes organized by the pro-people cultural organizations in different parts of the country. My address in some of these programmes is reproduced here... 
***  Before sharing my views on the tasks of artists-writers-intellectuals in the times of fascism, let me briefly define fascism and how it is different from totalitarianism. Totalitarianism is political concept, a dictatorship of an individual, family or group which prohibits opposition in any form, and exercises an extremely high degree of control over public and private life. It is also described as authoritarianism.
Whereas fascism, while retaining all these repressive characteristics, also believes in god-ordained superiority of race, cultur…

Ex-World Bank chief economist doubts spurt in India's ease of doing business rank

By Rajiv Shah
This is in continuation of my previous blog where I had quoted from a commentary which top economist Prof Kaushik Basu had written in the New York Times (NYT) a little less than a month ago, on November 6, to be exact. He recalled this article through a tweet on November 29, soon after it was made known that India's growth rate had slumped (officially!) to 4.5%.

With RSS around, does India need foreign enemy to undo its democratic-secular fabric?

By Shamsul Islam*
Many well-meaning liberal and secular political analysts are highly perturbed by sectarian policy decisions of RSS/BJP rulers led by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, especially after starting his second inning. They are vocal in red-flagging lynching incidents, policies of the Modi government on Kashmir, the National Register of Citizens (NRC), the demand for 'Bharat Ratna' to Savarkar who submitted 6-7 mercy petitions to the British masters (getting remission of 40 years out of 50 years' sentence), and the murder of constitutional norms in Goa, Karnataka and now in Maharashtra.

Post-Balakot, danger that events might spiral out of control is 'greater, not less'

By Tapan Bose*
The fear of war in South Asia is increasing. Tensions are escalating between India and Pakistan after the Indian defence minister's announcement in August this year that India may revoke its current commitment to only use nuclear weapons in retaliation for a nuclear attack, known as ‘no first use’. According to some experts who are watching the situation the risk of a conflict between the two countries has never been greater since they both tested nuclear weapons in 1998.

Rushdie, Pamuk, 260 writers tell Modi: Aatish episode casts chill on public discourse

Counterview Desk
As many as 260 writers, journalists, artists, academics and activists across the world, including Salman Rushdie, British Indian novelist, Orhan Pamuk, Turkish novelist and recipient of the 2006 Nobel Prize in literature, and Margaret Atwood, Canadian poet and novelist, have called upon Prime Minister Narendra Modi to review the decision to strip British Indian writer Aatish Taseer of his overseas Indian citizenship.

Worrying signs in BJP: Modi, Shah begin 'cold-shouldering' Gujarat CM, party chief

By RK Misra*
The political developments in neighbouring Maharashtra where a Shiv Sena-NCP-Congress government assumed office has had a trickle down effect in Gujarat with both the ruling BJP and the Congress opposition going into revamp mode.

'Favouring' tribals and ignoring Adivasis? Behind coercion of India's aborigines

By Mohan Guruswamy*
Tribal people account for 8.2% of India’s population. They are spread over all of India’s States and Union Territories. Even so they can be broadly classified into three groupings. The first grouping consists of populations who predate the Indo-Aryan migrations. These are termed by many anthropologists as the Austro-Asiatic-speaking Australoid people.