Skip to main content

India performs 'poorly' in Quality of Life Index, ranks 62nd out of 64 countries

Counterview Desk
“Expat Insider”, which claims to be one of the world’s most extensive surveys about living and working abroad, in a survey of 20,259 participants from around the globe, has found that of the 64 destinations around the globe, has found that while Taiwan is the best destination for persons living outside their native country, closely by Vietnam and Portugal, India ranks 59th.
Carried out between March 7 to 28, 2019, the online survey’s target audience included all kinds of expatriates, from foreign assignees — expats in the typical sense of employees on a corporate assignment — and international hires to self-made expats relocating for a better quality of life and people making the move for various other reasons.
Carrying information on five topical indices, Quality of Life, Ease of Settling In, Working Abroad, Family Life, and Personal Finance, the survey report ranks Kuwait. The other four countries which rank better than India are Italy, Nigeria, Brazil and Turkey. India’s neighbours – Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka – do not form part of the survey.
Perhaps that most negative factor for India in the report is about safety and security, in which India ranks 60th of 64 countries. The countries performing worse than India are Brazil, which ranks the worst, followed by South Africa, Nigeria and Argentina.
India's overall ranking
Pointing out that a major characteristic of India is living low-cost at a price, and asserting that in India “expats struggle to settle in India”, the report, prepared by InterNations, a global social network, based in Munich states, “High-paying jobs help expats to afford their life in India, while the lack of leisure options and culture shock take their toll.”
Among its top findings on India, the report states, “India comes in the top 10 countries for personal finance”, but “expats with full-time jobs in India work 3.8 hours per week, more than the global average” about “83% of respondents rate the quality of the environment negatively”, 48% struggle with “getting used to the Indian culture”, and 22% are “unhappier after moving abroad (vs 16% globally).” 

Observations on India:

India still performs poorly in the Quality of Life Index and comes in 62nd place out of 64 countries in 2019. The destination lags behind digitally (62nd): More than half the respondents (53% vs. 26% globally) rate the availability of administrative and government services online negatively.
Getting access to highspeed internet at home is also an issue for 26% of expats (globally: 15%), and 25% report that paying without cash isn’t easy (vs. 13% globally). Even worse, while only 7% worldwide struggle with getting a local mobile phone number, about two in five expats in India (38%) rate this factor negatively, landing India in last place (64th out of 64 countries).
The destination doesn’t perform well for its travel and transportation, either. Even though a good 75% rate the opportunity to travel positively — only slightly below the global average of 82% — over half the expats (55%) are unhappy with the transportation infrastructure, compared to only 21% globally. Moreover, 37% name a bad local infrastructure as one of their biggest concerns before moving to India (vs. 9% globally).

Expats Frown on Safety and Politics

India ranks 60th out of 64 countries when it comes to safety and security. Over four in ten respondents (44%) report negative feelings about the peacefulness in the country (globally: only 10%), and 27% are displeased with their personal safety — three times the global average of 9%.
A US American expat, for example, does not like “always having to keep my guard up — as a female, I don’t feel safe. As a resident, I often feel taken advantage of, at work and outside work.” In addition, almost double the global average (32% vs. 17% worldwide) rate the political stability of the country negatively. An Australian expat shares that “politics has become hardline, and there are social tensions”.

Pollution & a Lack of Leisure Options

India places 63rd out of 64 for leisure options. Two in five expats (40%) are unhappy with their socializing and leisure activities (globally: 19%), and 45% rate the available leisure activities in general negatively — nearly four times the global average of 12%. Placing 60th out of 64 countries, India doesn’t rank well for health and well-being, either.
This can mainly be attributed to the quality of the environment, which is rated negatively by more than eight in ten expats (83% vs. only 20% globally) — a staggering 44% even say it is very bad (vs. 4% globally).
A US American is worried about “the long-term health effects of so much pollution”, and an Australian expat is dissatisfied with “the pollution and lack of cleanliness in general”. However, affording healthcare at least doesn’t seem to be an issue for expats in India. The country ranks a good 15th place, with close to seven in ten respondents (69%) being satisfi ed with its costs — 14 percentage points above the global average of 55%.

Cultural Differences Make Feeling at Home Hard

Adapting to the local culture seems to be an obstacle for expats settling in India. In fact, the country places second to last (63rd) in the Feeling at Home subcategory: over four in ten expats (41%) struggle with feeling at home in the local culture (vs. 23% worldwide).
Also, close to half (48%) claim that it isn’t easy to get used to the local culture — more than double the global average of 20%. More than half (56%) generally find it difficult to settle down in this country, while only 23% of expats worldwide share the same struggle. A US American expat thinks that “the cultural norms are very different, and I have struggled to adapt”.

High Salaries for a Low-Cost Living 

Over one in five expats in India (21%) have been sent there by their employer, a share that is more than twice the global average of 10%. However, India ranks a poor 56th place out of 64 countries when it comes to working there.
Expats working full time in India do so an average 47.7 hours per week, compared to the global average of 43.9 hours. This means that they work 3.8 hours more compared to their counterparts worldwide. It is hardly surprising then that 37% rate their working hours negatively — compared to 19% globally — and more than four in ten (41%) struggle with finding a balance between their personal and professional life (vs. 21% globally).
However, the long work weeks at least seem to be well rewarded, as India shows great results in the Personal Finance Index, reaching the top 10 (9th out of 64 destinations). Double the global average even have an annual disposable income of 150,000 USD (18% vs. 9% worldwide).
In combination with a low cost of living — 69% rate this factor positively, compared to just 47% worldwide — this makes for a financially stable, and in some cases even luxurious, life: over six in ten (63%) report having a disposable household income that is more than they need to cover daily costs — 14 percentage points above the global average of 49%. 
A Swiss expat likes “the ease of relying on hired help in my daily life: I can offload household duties and delegate far more easily than in Switzerland.”

Comments

TRENDING

Savarkar 'criminally betrayed' Netaji and his INA by siding with the British rulers

By Shamsul Islam*
RSS-BJP rulers of India have been trying to show off as great fans of Netaji. But Indians must know what role ideological parents of today's RSS/BJP played against Netaji and Indian National Army (INA). The Hindu Mahasabha and RSS which always had prominent lawyers on their rolls made no attempt to defend the INA accused at Red Fort trials.

RSS supremo Deoras 'supported' Emergency, but Indira, Sanjay Gandhi 'didn't respond'

By Shamsul Islam*
National Emergency was imposed on the country by then Prime Minister Indira Gandhi on June 25-26, 1975, and it lasted for 19 months. This period is considered as ''dark times' for Indian democratic polity. Indira Gandhi claimed that due to Jaiprakash Narayan's call to the armed forces to disobey the 'illegal' orders of Congress rulers had created a situation of anarchy and there was danger to the existence of Indian Republic so there was no alternative but to impose Emergency under article 352 of the Constitution.

Letter to friends, mentors: Coming together of class, communal, corona viruses 'scary'

By Prof (Dr) Mansee Bal Bhargava*
COVID greetings from Ahmedabad to dear mentors and friends from around the world…
I hope you are keeping well and taking care of yourself besides caring for the people around you. I’m writing to learn how is the science and the society coping with the prevention and cure of the pandemic. I’m also writing to share the state of the corona virus that is further complicated with the long-standing class and communal viruses.

Hurried nod to Western Ghat projects: 16 lakh Goans' water security 'jeopardised'

Counterview Desk
Taking strong exception to "virtual clearances" to eco-sensitive projects in the Western Ghats, the National Alliance of People’s Movements (NAPM) in a statement has said urged for a review of the four-lane highway, 400 KV transmission line and double tracking of the railway line through the Bhagwan Mahavir Wildlife Sanctuary and Mollem National Park in Goa.

Disturbing signal? Reliance 'shifting focus' away from Indian petrochemical sector

By NS Venkataraman*
Reliance Industries Ltd (RIL), a large Indian company, has expanded and grown in a spectacular manner during the last few decades, like of which no industrial group in India has performed before. RIL is now involved in multi various activities relating to petroleum refineries, petrochemicals, oil and gas exploration, coal bed methane, life sciences, retail business, communication network, (Jio platform) media/entertainment etc.

Oxfam on WB project: ICT 'ineffective', privatised learning to worsen gender divide

By Rajiv Shah 
A top multinational NGO, with presence in several developed and developing countries, has taken strong exception to the World Bank part-funding Strengthening Teaching-Learning and Results for States (STARS) project in six Indian states – Himachal Pradesh, Kerala, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra and Odisha – for its emphasis on information and communication technology (ICT)-enabled approaches for teacher development, student assessment and digital platform for early childhood education.

Case for nationalising India's healthcare system amidst 'strong' private control

Counterview Desk
A draft discussion note, prepared by Dr Maya Valecha, a Gujarat-based gynecologist and activist, sent to the People's Union for Civil Liberties (PUCL) as also a large number of activists, academics and professionals as an email alert, is all set to create a flutter among policy experts for its strong insistence on nationalizing India’s healthcare system.

Cruel legacy of Green Revolution? Covid-19 underscores 'risky, fragile' food system

By Moin Qazi*  The Covid-19 crisis has highlighted the risks of an unhealthy diet and the extreme fragility of food systems. The economic reconstruction that will follow the pandemic is the perfect opportunity to provide better nutrition and health to all. The pandemic should spur us to redefine how we feed ourselves, and agricultural research can play a vital role in making our food systems more sustainable and resilient.

Coal blocks for tycoons: Rinchi village tribals may be declared forest land encroachers

By Gladson Dungdung*
On June 18, 2020, the Government of India initiated the process for auctioning 41 coal blocks for commercialisation. These coal blocks are located in different states within India and most of them fall under Fifth Schedule areas. The Indian government claims that their decision to auction these coal areas is a big step towards making the country Atmanirbhar Bharat (self-reliant) in the energy sector.