Skip to main content

Jharkhand: Written commitment sought to ban NPR/NRC, declare CAA black law

By Our Representative
Country-wide agitations against the Citizenship Amendment Act (CAA)/ National Register of Citizens (NRC) took a new turn in Ranchi on the Republic Day as thousands gathered in Idgah Maidan (Kadru) for a long evening of protest songs, poems and plays. The programme, “Ek Shaam Samvidhan ke Naam”, was held to reassert the constitutional values of liberty, equality and solidarity at a time when Indian democracy is allegedly under threat.
The event was organized by a wide coalition of individuals and organisations that are active in the movement against CAA/NRC in Jharkhand. Hundreds of women who are sitting on a continuous Shaheen Bagh-style sit-in in Kadru also joined.
The event began with a painting festival for children and their posters were displayed across the venue. The programme also included a rich series of songs, poems, plays, and short films around the theme of communal harmony. Pamphlets on dangers of CAA/NRC were distributed. The cultural programme started with Jhakhandi beats on nagadas and dhol-maandal by Elina and her friends.
These cultural performances brought together some of Jharkhand’s best artists and cultural activists. Veteran folk-singer Madhu Mansuri ‘Hasmukh’, who received Padmashri on Saturday, extended support to the protests with his well-known song, “Gaon Chhodab Nahi”. He said that in Jharkhandi society, different communities have always helped and supported each other. Filmmaker Meghnath, founder of AKHRA and one of the composers of the song, quipped that now the protest anthem should be “Desh Chodab Nabi.”
The Ranchi Youth Fellowship, a choir performed gospel music, while a performer sang bhajans. Children from different mohallas were also selected to sing patriotic melodies. Student group ‘Kahab to Lag Jayi Dhak Se’ who have been part of several anti-CAA/NRC/National Population Register (NPR) protests across street corners of Ranchi sang a combination of inspiring verses. Vishwanath and Anil Anshuman performed protest songs for social rights. A band, Amazing Life, regaled the people with a peppy song of solidarity.
Some well-known Jharkhandi poets supported the protest with their words. Jacinta Kerketta has consistently questioned state narratives on tribal development. Anuj Lugun’s poetry has supported indigenous renaissance and resistance against fascism and oppression. Prof Mithilesh, Aloka Kujur, Mehul and others also recited their own poetic compositions.
A topical play was also performed by the Indian People’s Theatre Association. The programme also saw performances by Tabish Ali, a rapper, Chandosree, Aamir Ali, Amreen Azad, Zohra and many others.
A civil rights release commented, “In Jharkhand, in the last five years, a climate of fear and hate has been created especially against adivasi and minority communities due to a series of inhuman mob lynchings and violence. In this charged atmosphere and with the plans of CAA/NRC and especially after the series of recent attacks on university campuses, street protests have erupted in the state and nationwide.”
It added, "Across Jharkhand, every day in the New Year from Ranchi to Daltonganj, Jamshedpur to Dhanbad, Bokaro to Ramgarh there have been spontaneous protests by students, civil society, unions, and especially women.”
Afzal Anis, one of the leading activists against CAA/NRC said, “In the last two months, many Indians and Muslims in particular have taken to the streets with the tiranga flag and readings of the preamble of the constitution, as we realise that only if the constitution is saved will the country be saved. Since independence never before have the symbols of our democracy been so visible across India”.
As the evening progressed, even as Ranchiites enjoyed the cultural performances, one of the main demands was for the newly-elected Jharkhand government to reassure the fraught sentiments of minority and tribal communities by issuing a written commitment to ban NPR/NRC activities in the state.
They also wanted the assembly to pass a resolution to repeal the CAA. Throughout the programme, the air was rent with slogans against this an unconstitutional “black law” as a threat to the secular ethos of Indian democracy in the 71st year of the Republic.

Comments

TRENDING

August 22 to be observed as Apostasy Day: International coalition of ex-Muslim groups

By Our Representative
In a unique move, an international coalition of ex-Muslim organisations has decided to observe August 22, 2020 as the Apostasy Day. To be observed for “the abandonment or renunciation of religion”, the coalition, calling upon people to join the call, said, the decision to observe the Apostasy Day has been taken because of apostasy is “punishable by death in Afghanistan, Iran, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritania, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, UAE, and Yemen.”

Buddhist shrines massively destroyed by Brahmanical rulers in "pre-Islamic" era: Historian DN Jha's survey

By Our Representative
Prominent historian DN Jha, an expert in India's ancient and medieval past, in his new book, "Against the Grain: Notes on Identity, Intolerance and History", in a sharp critique of "Hindutva ideologues", who look at the ancient period of Indian history as "a golden age marked by social harmony, devoid of any religious violence", has said, "Demolition and desecration of rival religious establishments, and the appropriation of their idols, was not uncommon in India before the advent of Islam".

RSS' 25,000 Shishu Mandirs 'follow' factory school model of Christian missionaries

By Bhabani Shankar Nayak*
The executive committee of the International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences (IUAES) recently decided to drop the KISS University in Odisha as the co-host of the World Anthropology Congress-2023. The decision is driven by the argument that KISS University is a factory school.

India must recognise: 4,085 km Himalayan borders are with Tibet, not China

By Tenzin Tsundue, Sandeep Pandey*
There has as been a cancerous wound around India’s Himalayan neck ever since India's humiliating defeat during the Chinese invasion of India in 1962. The recent Galwan Valley massacre has only added salt to the wound. It has come to this because, when China invaded the neighbouring country Tibet in 1950, India was in high romance with the newly-established communist regime under Mao Zedong after a bloody revolution.

Time to give Covid burial, not suspend, World Bank's 'flawed' Doing Business ranking

By Maju Varghese*
On August 27, the World Bank came out with a statement suspending the Doing Business Report. The statement said that a number of irregularities have been reported regarding changes to the data in the Doing Business 2018 and Doing Business 2020 reports, published in October 2017 and 2019. The changes in the data were inconsistent with the Doing Business methodology.

Swami Vivekananda's views on caste and sexuality were 'painfully' regressive

By Bhaskar Sur*
Swami Vivekananda now belongs more to the modern Hindu mythology than reality. It makes a daunting job to discover the real human being who knew unemployment, humiliation of losing a teaching job for 'incompetence', longed in vain for the bliss of a happy conjugal life only to suffer the consequent frustration.

Delhi riots: Cops summoning, grilling, intimidating young to give 'false' evidence

Counterview Desk
More than 440 concerned citizens have supported the statement issued by well-known bureaucrat-turned-human rights activist Harsh Mander ‘We will not be silenced’ which said that the communal riots in Delhi in February 2020 have not been caused by any conspiracy, as alleged by the Delhi Police, but by “hate speech and provocative statements made by a number of political leaders of the ruling party.”

WHO chief ignores India, cites Pak as one of 7 top examples in fight against Covid-19

By Our Representative
In a move that would cause consternation in India’s top policy makers in the Modi government, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, World Health Organization (WHO) director-general, has singled out Pakistan among seven countries that have set “examples” in investing in a healthier and safer future in order to fight the Covid-19 pandemic.

Tata Mundra: NGOs worry as US court rules World Bank can't be sued for 'damages'

By Kate Fried, Mir Jalal*
On August 24 evening, a federal court ruled that the World Bank Group cannot be sued for any damage caused by its lending, despite last year’s Supreme Court ruling in the same case that these institutions can be sued for their “commercial activity” in the United States.