Saturday, October 18, 2014

Congress' "cyber war" dream collapsing in Sonia Gandhi adviser Ahmed Patel's home turf, Gujarat

Ahmed Patel with Sonia Gandhi
By Our Representative
In less than a year of Congress president Sonia Gandhi’s political secretary Ahmed Patel announced that he would create a a "cyber army" to take on the BJP's 'onslaught' on the social media, the exercise has starting to collapse in his home turf, Gujarat. Things have come to such a pass that those claim to be running the cyber show for Congress are using the social media to blame the party high command for “lack of interest”. What is worse is that, of all persons, a senior Congress Umakant Mankad has said that the “herculean task” of running the IT cell of the Congress has become the victim of “authoritarian decisions” of a few leaders.
Mankad is an important name in Gujarat. He first became famous during the Jayprakash Narayan-led Navnirman movement in mid-1970s as one of its top young leaders, and fought against Indira Gandhi's emergency. While refusing to name individuals, Mankad said in a comment he posted on Facebook that the “responsibility of the IT cell was handed over to those who remained inactive all through, as a result of which the Congress’ social medial has suffered a major setback.”
Predicting that as a result, disillusioned individuals, he was sure, would “move away" from the party very soon, maybe in the "next few hours”, Mankad said, “As guardian in charge of the IT cell, I tried to keep the organization intact, but I seem to be failing in my effort. I have tried my best, but I have not been able to get the desired results.” Suggesting that he would wish to quit from his responsibility, he declared, “I am not the person who, even after having failed on my duty, would continue clinging on to my post”.
Mankad’s sharp comment has triggered a wave of support among those who claim to be in the Congress’ effort to “take on” the BJP through the IT cell. Suhel Narot wrote, he “respected” Mankad’s views and feelings, but asked him not to go to the social media to “express internal Congress issues”. Yet, he added, “This is the bitter truth of the Congress: At the grassroots level everyone is active, but at the top it’s all hollow.” 

Munaf Patel's post on Facebook, Caption:
"Only weak need influence to fight it out"
Manoj Joshi said, whatever Mankad has said is absolutely true; “those who are inactive and are holding on their posts should be removed forthwith, while those who have dedicated their precious time should replace them.”
Ajay Raval said, “In our party, there is no value of those who are hard working.” Hiren Upadhayay said, “Those who are active have no posts.” Munaf Desai underlined, “Those who suffer know what’s happening. People in important posts are misusing their power by remaining indifferent. Despite having suffered so badly, the high command does not seem to have opened its eyes.” 
Prashant Parmar went so far as to say in his Facebook comment that time had come to “remove" the “clique” which has captured the social media, and if this is not done he knows how to go against the clique and write on it. Jagdish Parikh added, while it had been a “positive step” to involve youth in Congress’ social media, the “biggest mistake was to set up an IT cell, posting some individuals as  head. These individuals should be removed to rectify the mistake”.
Replying to this, Dhruv Pandit described these type of comments only helped the opponents, who were “conspiring” against the Congress. But he also did not fail to add, “It seems, important persons are trying to save their skins… Everyone wants to be leader, see their photos in the media…”

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